Community events – Crestview NA http://crestviewna.org/ Wed, 18 May 2022 00:02:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://crestviewna.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-23-120x119.png Community events – Crestview NA http://crestviewna.org/ 32 32 Northeast News | Northeast public parks bustling with community events on weekends https://crestviewna.org/northeast-news-northeast-public-parks-bustling-with-community-events-on-weekends/ Wed, 18 May 2022 00:02:07 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/northeast-news-northeast-public-parks-bustling-with-community-events-on-weekends/ Kansas City Public Library Northeast BranchSamantha Edwards’ Children’s Librarian shares free books with children at Mattie Rhodes’ Block Party at Budd Park on May 14. Photo by Abby Hoover Budd Park Mattie Rhodes Center held a Block Party in Budd Park on Saturday afternoon. “The overall goal is to bring people back to the neighborhood, […]]]>
Kansas City Public Library Northeast BranchSamantha Edwards’ Children’s Librarian shares free books with children at Mattie Rhodes’ Block Party at Budd Park on May 14. Photo by Abby Hoover

Budd Park

Mattie Rhodes Center held a Block Party in Budd Park on Saturday afternoon.

“The overall goal is to bring people back to the neighborhood, to experience it, to have fun, and to take advantage of some of the amenities that we have here like Budd Park,” said Scott Wagner, director of North East Alliance Together (NEAT). “So our desires are simple, but it is very necessary.”

The organizations hope to hold more block parties in July and October. About 15 organizations were represented at the event, which provided opportunities to have fun and learn a bit, and to share resources that exist.

Lykins Neighborhood Association. Photo by Abby Hoover
Show me KC schools distributes information to people in the Northeast. Photo by Bethany Alzanadi
Children spin a prize wheel at the Big Brothers Big Sisters of KC stand. Photo by Bethany Alzanadi

The northeast corner of Budd Park, where the event was held, was bustling with activity Saturday, with new and old businesses scattered around the block.

“That’s what we want here at Indian Mound,” Wagner said. “We want activity, and activity comes in the form of businesses, it shows up in what’s going on in the park, and the more positive activity you have in the neighborhood, the more negative activity is likely to disappear. Seeing all of that is very gratifying, and of course seeing people come out as they are today is just as gratifying.

Paula Coyote Schaff, clinical therapist and trauma specialist at the Mattie Rhodes Center, paints faces for the Spring Block Party event at Budd Park. Photo by Bethany Alzanadi
Children spin a prize wheel at the KC Big Brothers Big Sisters booth. Photo by Abby Hoover

The mini-court project, sponsored by Mattie Rhodes, was completed last year at Budd Park.

“Some schools take advantage of it, groups of kids take advantage of it,” Wagner said. To do.”

Mattie Rhodes Center and La Incondicional Cocina are offering free Spring Block Party tacos at Budd Park. Photo by Bethany Alzanadi

Competition park

Ryogoku Soccer Academy, Independence Boulevard Christian Church, OlamaKCPD, 816 SFCand other area organizations held a community event at the Concourse on Saturday.

Local children play garden games at the Concourse Park. Photo by Abby Hoover

Community involvement was central to the event, said Hector Moises Solorio, director of training at Ryogoku.

“And bringing people together to say ‘thank you’ to the community and everyone who has helped Ryogoku get to where we are now as a school,” Solorio said. “With community members, with businesses in the community, coming together and providing this type of service for the community.”

Ryogoku Soccer Academy students pose for a photo in front of the Concourse Park fountain. Photo by Bethany Alzanadi

Ryogoku, based at the Independence Boulevard Christian Church on Independence and Gladstone Boulevards, works with boys in grades six through nine.

The event served at least 50 Northeast children and their families, providing resources from 12 different organizations, food and fun. The young school actively recruits students in the Northeast.

Jerusalem Farm members discuss a new community survey with locals. Photo by Bethany Alzanadi

“[We’re] really trying to focus on the kids in the North East and East districts and making sure they have high quality educational options, and we can also provide high quality football education said founder Brad Leonard. “We do kind of a year-round pattern, so we take time out in December, we take time out for Ramadan. Because of our Muslim population, we want to be respectful of that time. Then we take a few weeks off. holidays in the summer, so it’s a unique model, but I think the kids stay very actively engaged and keep their learning at a very high level.”

KC Walking Bike and Ripples for change stand. Photo by Bethany Alzanadi

Ryogoku is currently working with Mattie Rhodes and the Veterans Project to raise funds to help neighborhood youth obtain safe and stable housing.

“Thank you to all the organizations that participated in this event and we appreciate the support and dedication you have for our institution,” Solorio said, adding that they have another event coming up on July 9.

KCPD East Patrol PIO Edwin Gordillo and his family share ice cream with children attending a community appreciation event at the Concourse last weekend. Photo by Abby Hoover
Families play yard games at Concourse Park. Photo by Bethany Alzanadi




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Nonprofit Community Events in Mecosta County https://crestviewna.org/nonprofit-community-events-in-mecosta-county/ Tue, 10 May 2022 10:07:49 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/nonprofit-community-events-in-mecosta-county/ Looking for something to do? The Stay Local Events Calendar posts a list of nonprofit and community events on Tuesdays and Fridays. Please check with your club or organization to be certain of meetings, outings and classes as they may be canceled due to bad weather or COVID-19. If a listing is inaccurate or to […]]]>

Looking for something to do? The Stay Local Events Calendar posts a list of nonprofit and community events on Tuesdays and Fridays. Please check with your club or organization to be certain of meetings, outings and classes as they may be canceled due to bad weather or COVID-19. If a listing is inaccurate or to submit an event, contact Julie Norwood at 231-592-8358 or julie.norwood@pioneergroup.com.

Ferris State University Police Memorial Ceremony: 9 a.m. on Tuesday, May 10, at the North Stage area of ​​the Robinson Quad. Rainy place, University Center, 805 Campus Drive, Big Rapids. Honoring and honoring officers who have died in the line of duty.


GFWC Big Rapids “Another Woman’s Treasures” Garage Sale: 12pm-4pm Thursday 12 May; 9am-4pm Friday 13 May; and 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Saturday May 14; at Mecosta Twp Hall at 19729 11 Mile Road, Rogers Heights. Proceeds from the garage sale will be donated to our local pantries with a portion going towards future GFWC charitable projects.

AAUW Cocktails and Conversations: 5-6:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 18, at Artworks, 106 N. Michigan Ave. in Big Rapids. Great Rapids. The American Association of University Women is hosting a social event for anyone to learn about our organization and discuss women’s equity. Light refreshments provided. To reserve a spot or for more information, email aauwbirapids@gmail.com.

COVID-19 vaccination clinic: 9 a.m. to noon Friday, May 20 at the Mecosta County Commission on Aging and Activity Center. District #10 Health Department will have all 3 vaccine brands available. Open to the public.

Wine and Canvas: 6-9 p.m. Friday, May 20, at Artworks, 106 N. Michigan Ave. in Big Rapids. Great Rapids. A social painting experience. Bring your own drinks and snacks and relax. No experience necessary; all equipment provided

Spectrum Mobile Mammography: Starting at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 21 at the Morley Community Center, 151 E. 7th St. Morley. Free mammograms will be available for uninsured or underinsured women. Call 616-4866022 to see if you qualify. To schedule your appointment, call 877-495-2626.

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Funds available for community events https://crestviewna.org/funds-available-for-community-events/ Fri, 06 May 2022 01:14:00 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/funds-available-for-community-events/ The Eurobodalla Council calls for proposals from companies and organizations for events or festivals that it can organize in partnership with the community. The Council has received funding from the Department of Regional NSW through its Reconnecting Regional NSW Community Events programme, which encourages councils to work with their communities on priority events. Funded events […]]]>

The Eurobodalla Council calls for proposals from companies and organizations for events or festivals that it can organize in partnership with the community.

The Council has received funding from the Department of Regional NSW through its Reconnecting Regional NSW Community Events programme, which encourages councils to work with their communities on priority events.

Funded events must bring people together, benefit the whole Eurobodalla community, be free or cheap and not already be funded by the NSW Government.

Funding is available for new and existing initiatives, which could include non-profit markets and bazaars, festivals and fairs, sporting events, gastronomic and leisure events, recovery events, classes and community workshops, regional race carnivals, touring and theater programs and holiday celebrations, such as for Australia Day or Anzac Day.

Funding applications can be made via the Council’s Smarty Grants portal before Sunday, May 15, 2022.

/Public release. This material from the original organization/authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author or authors.View Full here.

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Amp Announces Community Events | News, Sports, Jobs https://crestviewna.org/amp-announces-community-events-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 04:11:51 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/amp-announces-community-events-news-sports-jobs/ YOUNGSTOWN — Toronto electro-jazz band Four80East will headline the Youngstown Jazz and Wine Fest, and The Vindys will return to the Youngstown Foundation Amphitheater this summer. These and other events were announced on Friday as part of Premier Bank’s series of community events on the outdoor site. According to Ken Bigley, vice president […]]]>

YOUNGSTOWN — Toronto electro-jazz band Four80East will headline the Youngstown Jazz and Wine Fest, and The Vindys will return to the Youngstown Foundation Amphitheater this summer.

These and other events were announced on Friday as part of Premier Bank’s series of community events on the outdoor site.

According to Ken Bigley, vice president of JAC Live and JAC Management, which operates the city-owned amphitheater, the season begins with a new event, a Summer Literacy Expo, presented by schools in the city of Youngstown and designed to encourage summer learning.

“There will be an organized community fair with games and activities,” he said. “It’s a way of saying learning can be fun and gives them things to go with over the summer, like where to get a library card.”

The free event from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday will include appearances from Glenda Hatchett, who starred in the court reality series “Judge Hatchett,” and author/music educator Vicky Weber, whose books for children include “Aurora’s Orchid”, “Taino Tales: The Secret of the Hummingbird” and “The Garden of Songs”.

The Vindys, who played there in 2020 and 2021, will return on June 4.

“They’re really pretty much the premier band in the area,” Bigley said. “They don’t play much in the Valley, and the CD release party (for ‘Bugs’) last year was very successful and we’re planning the same this year.”

Vindys lead singer Jackie Popovec said: “We’re really thrilled. We want to do big for our hometown fans and go all out, maybe have a surprise guest or two.

The amp show comes before the band plays its first West Coast dates in July.

“The support from our local base in the northeast region of Ohio has been so good for us; we managed to make that happen,” she said.

Four80East, run by Rob DeBoer and Tony Grace, has been on JAC’s wish list for the Youngstown Wine and Jazz Fest for several years, Bigley said, and they were finally able to make it happen this year.

“We’ve heard them play a few times over the years, and they’ve always been phenomenal,” he said. “Jeff Green (who programs Youngstown’s Jazz in the Park series) highly recommended them.”

Youngstown native Sharon Rae North will also perform at the July 9 event.

“She was successful in Atlanta and she’s someone we always wanted to bring home and showcase,” Bigley said.

Youngstown Jazz and Wine Fest will coincide with Youngstown State University’s Summer Arts Festival, to be held in Wean Park on July 9-10.

Another new event for 2022 is Night Out for Neighborhoods on September 16. JAC is teaming up with neighborhood watch groups for an evening that will include a performance by high-energy show band 76 Degrees West. A portion of the proceeds from the event will benefit participating neighborhood watch organizations.

This is the fourth year that Premier Bank has been title sponsor of the community event series.

Jordan Ryan, Executive Director of the Amphitheater and Wean Park, said in a statement: “We are thrilled to see all the people who have made our community events their summer traditions and the new faces we will see as we continue to expand the reach of our event programming in this series.

Youngstown’s summer movie series was also announced on Friday. While most of the films will screen in nearby Wean Park, a screening of “Space Jam” – the 1996 version starring Michael Jordan – is scheduled at the amp on July 22.

The Wean Park film series mixes recent box office hits like “Ghostbusters: Afterlife,” “Spider-Man: No Way Home” and “Encanto” with 1980s and ’90s favorites like “The Karate Kid,” Scrooged” and “Hocus Pocus.”

Aspasia Lyras-Bernacki, Film Series Coordinator, said: “This year I feel like everything is on (again), so I wanted to come up with something fun, interesting, lighthearted and family.”

All movies start at dusk and admission is free.

Premier Bank¯ Community Event Series Thursday — Summer Literacy Expo with Judge Glenda Hatchett and children’s author Vicky Weber, 5-8 p.m. (free)

• June 4 — The Vindys at 7:30 p.m. ($17 and $7 plus service charge)

• July 9 — Youngstown Wine and Jazz Fest with Four80East and Sharon Rae North at 7 p.m. ($22 and $7 plus service charge)

• July 22 – The movie “Space Jam” (1996 version starring Michael Jordan) at Dusk as part of the Youngstown Summer Movie Series (free)

• September 16 – Night for the Neighborhoods with 76 degrees West at 7:30 p.m. ($20 and $10 plus service charge)

• October 2 — Mahoning Valley Sojourn to the Past’s Ohio Nonviolence Week Parade (time to be announced/free)

The amphitheater is located at 201 S. Phelps St., Youngstown. Paid events are on sale now through Ticketmaster.

Youngstown Summer Film Series

• June 20 – “Ghostbusters Afterlife” (2021)

• June 27 — “Encanto” (2021)

• July 11 – “The Karate Kid” (1984)

• July 25 – “Scrooged” (1988)

• August 1 — “Spider-Man: No Way Home” (2021)

• August 8 — “Hocus Pocus” (1993)

• August 15 — “School of Rock” (2003)

Movies start at dusk at Wean Park, 201 S. Phelps St., Youngstown. The Youngstown Summer Movie Series is presented in conjunction with JAC Live, the City of Youngstown and the Penguin City Brewing Company.



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Boys and Girls Clubs, Townsend Center plan community events https://crestviewna.org/boys-and-girls-clubs-townsend-center-plan-community-events/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 14:36:36 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/boys-and-girls-clubs-townsend-center-plan-community-events/ RICHMOND, Ind. – Jobs and community information will be shared at a community resource fair on May 17. Reid Health Community Outreach and the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County are teaming up for the fair, which will take place from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. May 17 at First Bank Boys & Girls […]]]>

RICHMOND, Ind. – Jobs and community information will be shared at a community resource fair on May 17.

Reid Health Community Outreach and the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County are teaming up for the fair, which will take place from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. May 17 at First Bank Boys & Girls Club, 855 N. 12th St., according to a Press release. The fair will be held in the parking lot of the Reverend James M. Townsend Memorial Building, unless weather conditions require it to move inside the gymnasium.

Organizations will share their available resources and job vacancies during the event. There will also be free food and gifts, including $100 Visa gift cards for one adult and one student in attendance, the statement said.

The Boys & Girls Club will unveil a small free library and Mt. Olive Baptist Church, which is across the street, will unveil a free community pantry at the club’s location. Another small free library is planned for the Ronald L. McDaniel Boys & Girls Club at 1900 W. Main St. The Richmond Women’s Workshop will help club members build benches for the libraries.

The fair, libraries, and pantry are provided through a $6,000 grant from Forward Wayne County’s Neighborhood Involvement and Community Engagement Program with funds provided by the Lilly Endowment.

Townsend Community Center Inc. purchased the former Richmond Day Nursery building at 300 N. 10th St.

Townsend will celebrate with a block party

RICHMOND — The Townsend Community Center invites the community of Wayne County to a block party.

The party will take place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on May 21 at Townsend’s new location, 300 N. 10th St.

Community and educational resources will be available, as well as free food. The block party received a $2,000 grant from the NICE program.

Last year, Townsend Community Center purchased the old Richmond Daycare building. Tours will be available.

More information is available by calling 765-488-2042 or online at www.townsendcommunitycenter.org.

Look for birds, like this cardinal, May 6-22 at the Cope Environmental Center Birdathon.

Count the birds for the Cope Birdathon

CENTREVILLE — The Cope Environmental Center fundraising Birdathon runs May 6-22.

Everyone is invited to participate by going out and counting the species of birds. Participants are encouraged to recruit sponsors who will donate in kind or make a lump sum donation towards the effort.

To help you out, Cope is offering free birding hikes from 7-8 a.m. Tuesday and 9-10 a.m. Saturday through May 28.

Register on copeenvironmental.org/birdathon/.

Conference to promote local youth leadership

RICHMOND — A group of students from Earlham College will host a free youth leadership conference on May 7 at the college.

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COMMUNITY EVENTS | News | duboiscountyherald.com https://crestviewna.org/community-events-news-duboiscountyherald-com/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/community-events-news-duboiscountyherald-com/ COMMUNITY EVENTS Medicine cabinet cleaning daySPENCER COUNTY – Several Spencer County Volunteer Fire Departments will be hosting a Medicine Cabinet Clean-Up Day on Saturday, April 30, from 8 a.m. to noon. Return your expired or unused prescriptions and over-the-counter medications. Do not rinse. What you rinse off could end up in your drinking water. Prescription […]]]>

COMMUNITY EVENTS

Medicine cabinet cleaning daySPENCER COUNTY – Several Spencer County Volunteer Fire Departments will be hosting a Medicine Cabinet Clean-Up Day on Saturday, April 30, from 8 a.m. to noon. Return your expired or unused prescriptions and over-the-counter medications. Do not rinse. What you rinse off could end up in your drinking water. Prescription drugs are used more frequently than illicit drugs. Seventy percent of teenagers get their drugs from friends or relatives. Turn in the drugs to the Dale, Rockport, Santa Claus, or St. Meinrad Fire Departments.

healthy children’s daySANTA — Healthy Kids Day will be held at Santa’s Lodge on Saturday, April 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in conjunction with the Flex Your Muscle Car show. The Tri-County YMCA will be hosting the event and offering an assortment of fun activities. Kids can enjoy an obstacle course, relay race, fitness bingo, birdhouse building, and more. The event is free and open to the public.

SWMD Saturday CollectionSPENCER COUNTY – The Spencer County Solid Waste Management District Office located at 918 E CR800N Chrisney, Ind. will be open Saturday, May 7 from 8 a.m. to noon to accept electronic waste (TVs/computers/etc.), tires and RDD items (paint/chemicals). Fees will be charged for electronic waste and tires; RDD items are free. cash only for special program fees, no trash tags will be accepted. For more information, contact the SWMD office, 812-362-7401.

pork chop dinnerCHRISNEY — The Spencer County Council on Aging is hosting a take-out-only pork chop dinner on Sunday, May 1 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Spencer County Youth and Community Center. $12.00 includes pork chops, creek fries, green beans and cookies. Tickets will be pre-sold. Call 812-649-9828 to purchase or contact any SCCOA employee or board member to purchase. All proceeds will go to the SCCOA Transportation and Homemaker programs.

spaghetti dinnerRICHLAND — Masonic Lodge 702 in Richland City is hosting its annual spaghetti dinner on Sunday, May 1. Service begins at 11 a.m. The lodge is located on W. Adams St. in Richland. There will be spaghetti, salad, dessert and drink. Voluntary donations accepted.

Rabies ClinicSPENCER COUNTY – St. Francis Animal Health Care has a rabies clinic in Spencer County. The cost is $10. Age requirements: Three months or more. ALL DOGS AND CATS MUST BE RENTED OR PROPERLY RESTRAINED.

Dates, places and times:

Saturday, April 30 at the Hatfield Fire Department from 3-4 p.m. For more information call 812-937-4733

Flex your muscle car showSANTA – Santa’s Lodge and the Tri-County YMCA in Ferdinand, Ind., are hosting a car show on April 30. Cars, Jeeps, Trucks, Motorcycles and Rat Rods are invited to participate in the event for a chance to win one of 60+ trophies. The first 75 registrants will receive gift bags; The first 100 to register will receive scoreboard plaques. Half pots and door prizes will be available. Exhibitor registration is $15 before April 23, 2022; late registration/registration day, $20. Register on www.tricountyymca.org. Spectators can see a wide range of amazing vehicles. In addition, food trucks will be available. Healthy Kids Day will be held in conjunction with the car show, so bring the whole family for a day of fun.

Stir-n-Up Hope 20th Anniversary CelebrationCHRISNEY — Help Stir-n-Up Hope mark 20 years of service to the surrounding community on Saturday, May 7 at the Spencer County Youth and Community Center at 5 p.m. Spring Fling guests will enjoy dinner, dancing, a silent auction, and learning about the organization’s vision for the future. This is a 21+ event. Tickets can be purchased online for $25. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/stir-n-hope-spring-fling-tickets-294801357797?utm-campaign=social&utm-content=attendeeshare&utm-medium=discovery&utm-term=listing&utm-source=cp&aff= escb

Stir-n-Up Hope is a non-profit organization that offers free therapeutic riding sessions to people with disabilities.

The order of events:

5-6 p.m.: Social hour including fun western activities, western photo cash bar, silent and live auction items.

6 p.m.: Dinner offered by Oink Smokehouse.

Silent Auction ends at 7 p.m. and Live Auction begins

8:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. dance to live music provided by Flat Stanley Band

5K Run/Walk in Mr. Lincoln’s Neighborhood

LINCOLN CITY – Friends of Lincoln State Park and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources will co-host the annual Mr. Lincoln Neighborhood 5K Run/Walk. This year’s 5K run/walk course will begin and end at the Lake Lincoln Beach parking lot. The moderate course will include paved park roads and some hiking trails.

Prizes will be awarded to the first men and women for adults and children under the age of 16. Random door prizes will also be awarded during the event.

Registration fee is $20 until April 30; $30 on or after May 1.

Park entry fees of $7 per vehicle from Indiana or $9 per vehicle out of state will apply and are not included in the entry fee.

Check-in begins at 8:30 a.m. CT and racing begins at 9 a.m. CT.

Registration and additional information available at www.lspfriends.com.

heritage day in springROCKPORT – Relive history as you travel back to when and where Lincoln grew up. Spring Heritage Day will be held Saturday, May 14 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Lincoln Pioneer Village and Museum. A day of fun and education for all ages, with costumed performers, protesters, sheep shearing, storyteller Susan Fowler, children’s activities, museum tour, authors and artists showcasing their work , their music, their food, etc. Admission fees: $5 per adult, $3 for seniors 55 and over, $3 for children 12 and under.

Lincoln Heritage Library Adult Programs in MayAll programs listed take place at the Dale branch.

May 2: Chair Workouts at 5 p.m. These fun and effective seated workouts are suitable for all fitness levels.

Cross stitch starts at 6 p.m. The group will do counted cross stitch. Angie will teach anyone who hasn’t cross stitched. Everyone will leave with their project, a small hoop and a cross-stitch needle.

May 5: Yoga with Angie at 5 p.m. We do a different routine each week and we always adhere to the rule that what happens in Yoga stays in Yoga.

May 9: Chair Workouts at 5 p.m. These fun and effective seated workouts are great for all fitness levels.

Coloring for adults at 6 p.m. In honor of National Mental Health Month, we’ll be having an hour of stress-free adult coloring.

May 11: Afternoon book club at 1 p.m. We’ll be discussing Sophie Hannah’s “Perfect Little Children.”

May 12: Yoga with Angie at 5 p.m. We do a different routine each week and we always adhere to the rule that what happens in Yoga stays in Yoga.

Creative Colors Art Group 5:30-7:30 p.m. A time for new and established artists to come together and paint and talk about various artistic topics.

May 16: Chair Workouts at 5 p.m. These fun and effective seated workouts are great for all fitness levels.

Book bingo at 6 p.m. Join us for a fun hour of bingo play to win books and book-related prizes.

May 17: Evening book club at 6 p.m. We will discuss “Steel Tide” by Natalie C. Parker.

May 19: Yoga with Angie at 5 p.m. We do a different routine each week and we always adhere to the rule that what happens in Yoga stays in Yoga.

May 23: Chair Workouts at 5 p.m. These fun and effective seated workouts are great for all fitness levels.

Late spring and early summer planting lessons with volunteer Purdue Master Gardener Jane Jenkins. Jane will teach us how to plant for late spring/early summer and everyone will plant and bring home the appropriate seeds for the season.

May 26: Yoga with Angie at 5 p.m. We do a different routine each week and we always adhere to the rule that what happens in Yoga stays in Yoga.

Throughout the month: games, coloring sheets and crayons will be left on the cafe table for anyone to use to relax, take some time out or just need a break etc. for national mental health. Anyone can use them anytime during our regular hours.

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Community Events Planned in Halifax County to Mark Earth Day | Local News https://crestviewna.org/community-events-planned-in-halifax-county-to-mark-earth-day-local-news/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/community-events-planned-in-halifax-county-to-mark-earth-day-local-news/ Friday is Earth Day, and community events are planned for Saturday to educate the public about protecting the Earth and give them a chance to do their part in protecting the environment. The Halifax County Community Cleanup Day will take place on Saturday, giving families the opportunity to clean up their neighborhood, and families can […]]]>

Friday is Earth Day, and community events are planned for Saturday to educate the public about protecting the Earth and give them a chance to do their part in protecting the environment.

The Halifax County Community Cleanup Day will take place on Saturday, giving families the opportunity to clean up their neighborhood, and families can also enjoy the Earth Day Extravaganza at the Halifax Marketplace on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. .

The 14th annual Earth Day will offer families the chance to enjoy children’s activities, information booths, food and more.

“It will be both educational and fun, and the weather is looking great,” said event coordinator Susie Robbins.

The first 100 participants will receive an Earth Day drawstring bag and there will be garden plants and seeds, while supplies last.

They will also have Earth Day drive-in bags for people who may not feel comfortable attending in person.

This year’s event will also feature local farmers, artisans, food vendors D&D Skins and Italian restaurant Viny’s.

The Halifax County Master Gardeners and Beekeepers Association will be on hand to share information and answer questions from curious minds of all ages.

Participants can also attend a demonstration of basket weaving by Zelliph.






Kayla Cleary decorates a butterfly watering tray during the 2021 Halifax Earth Day Extravaganza at the Halifax Marketplace.




New this year, the “Think Outside the Trash” art competition challenges participants to create works of art using discarded plastic materials.

Some organizations and families have already dropped off their creations at the Halifax Marketplace and plan to accept additional entries on Saturday.

So far, Halifax County Little Theater has been among the participants with their mural as well as Nola Watkin’s creation. Residents of Commonwealth Assisted Living have also created works of art.

Entries must be made of at least 70% discarded plastic materials such as beverage bottles, caps and laundry detergent cans, and centered on a nature theme such as plants, animals, fish, insects, rivers and/or oceans.

Pieces can be 3D style or wall mounted.

Artwork will be judged on adherence to theme and materials, originality, craftsmanship, and use of color and texture.

Winners will be announced at 1 p.m. during the Earth Day Extravaganza.







Earth

Ashantianna Chisolm and Kevontae Chisolm make bird feeders out of pine cones during the 2019 Earth Day extravaganza.




Cash prizes will be awarded to the first, second and third place winners in each entry category.

Activities for children include:

w Digging in the Dirt – Plant Your Own Floral Sensory Station – Sponsored by Abbott Farm Suppliers;

w Crafts for Children with Mrs. Sue Brooks of Halifax County Libraries;

w Flower print, recycled plastic floral art, rock painting – Sponsored by the Halifax Market Place; and

w Take-home coloring activities for Earth Day.

Some activities for children will take place outside while others will take place inside the market.

Upon arrival, attendees are encouraged to stop in front of the market building to pick up a ticket to register for door prizes.

There will be draws throughout the day for gift cards from Sheetz, Peddlers Market, The Packhouse, Applebee’s, Schewels Furniture Store, The Cozy Cottage, Viny’s Italian Restaurant and Frutopia.

Additional prizes include: summer theater tickets, a wheelbarrow and pruner from True-Value, three miracle grow bags and a children’s gardening tool set from Tractor Supply, mulch from Jerry Epps Landscaping, room checks from Yancey Wholesale Supply and a picnic table and library donated by community members.

In addition to Earth Day activities, the market will also have its regular vendors offering baked goods, produce, crafts and more.

“We also encourage people to take a day to experience the city of Halifax,” Robbins said.

Public libraries in South Boston and Halifax will also host Earth Day activities.

For Community Cleanup Day, individuals can pick up orange trash bags for free at Halifax City Hall, Halifax County Visitor Center, Halifax County Chamber of Commerce, at Sentara Volens Family Medicine, the South Boston Farmers Market or the Town of Halifax Farmers Market.

Participants can also visit the Halifax County Chamber of Commerce website for a list of areas in need and to let the chamber know which area you plan to clean.

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Amarillo area celebrates Earth Day with community events | KAMR https://crestviewna.org/amarillo-area-celebrates-earth-day-with-community-events-kamr/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/amarillo-area-celebrates-earth-day-with-community-events-kamr/ AMARILLO, Texas (KAMR/KCIT) – As part of efforts to honor Earth Day Friday, the city of Amarillo and other organizations including the Don Harrington Discovery Center (DHDC), Wildcat Bluff Nature Center and the Amarillo Zoo announced events across the community. The city of Amarillo recognized Earth Day with a week-long neighborhood cleanup, set to last […]]]>

AMARILLO, Texas (KAMR/KCIT) – As part of efforts to honor Earth Day Friday, the city of Amarillo and other organizations including the Don Harrington Discovery Center (DHDC), Wildcat Bluff Nature Center and the Amarillo Zoo announced events across the community.

The city of Amarillo recognized Earth Day with a week-long neighborhood cleanup, set to last through Friday, and set up several trash and trash drop-off locations around the city.

via the City of Amarillo Facebook page

April 23

The Wildcat Bluff Nature Center has announced that it will host a series of special guests from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday. Admission for adults was $4 and $3 for children over three and adults over 60. Scheduled special appearances, according to the event announcement, include the Texas Master Naturalists, Panhandle Archaeological Society, The Wild Hanburys, Palo Duro Bee Club, and Kathleen Guerrero.

Also on Saturday, the Amarillo Zoo announced that it would welcome volunteers to clean up Thompson Park in an effort to serve the community. The event will also include crafts and other activities in the zoo, according to the announcement. Interested persons can register by calling the Amarillo Zoo at 806-670-0792 or emailing zooeducation@amarillo.gov.

April 24

The DHDC announced that it has partnered with West Texas A&M University and the American Chemical Society to celebrate Earth Day through chemistry. From 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on April 24, pre-registered students can explore ways to recycle, reduce and reuse using chemistry. Additionally, DHDC said attendees will explore hands-on learning, listen to guest presentations, and participate in interactive demonstrations.

April 25

On Monday, April 25, the Texas Panhandle Art Education Association (TPAEA) announced that it will be partnering with Snack Pak 4 Kids to host its Spring Recycled Art Exhibit and Earth Day Reception. The event is scheduled for 5-7 p.m. at the Blank Spaces Art Gallery, and the TPAEA said it will include art created from recycled materials.

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Celebrate Earth Day with community events for young and old https://crestviewna.org/celebrate-earth-day-with-community-events-for-young-and-old/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 02:09:37 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/celebrate-earth-day-with-community-events-for-young-and-old/ Tuesday Repair Coffee Tuesday April 19, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Robert Crown branch of the EPLSign up for a one-on-one appointment with Evanston Repair Café volunteers who can help you repair your small appliance or general repair item. Limited slots are still open. Register now. Get your bike ready for springThursday […]]]>

Tuesday Repair Coffee
Tuesday April 19, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Robert Crown branch of the EPL

Sign up for a one-on-one appointment with Evanston Repair Café volunteers who can help you repair your small appliance or general repair item. Limited slots are still open. Register now.

Get your bike ready for spring
Thursday April 21 from 6pm to 8pm at the Robert Crown branch of the EPL

Wheel & Sprocket Evanston bike mechanic Liam Ouweleen will show you how to get your bike ready for spring. Bring your bike and go ready to roll! Full event.

Downtown Evanston Spring Cleaning
Friday, April 22, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Celebrate Earth Day with Downtown Evanston by volunteering at their Spring cleaning! Downtown Evanston will provide gloves, bags and scavengers and direct volunteers to areas where litter tends to accumulate. The group that picks up the most litter throughout the city center will receive a prize! RSVP today!

Climate Film Festival in 10 Seconds
Friday, April 22, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Join the District 65 Climate Action Teams and Citizens’ Greener Evanston in celebrating Earth Week with a 10 Second Film Festival at Rotary International, 1560 Sherman Ave.

The Ecology Center Library Earth Day Celebrations
Saturday April 23 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Join EPL’s Earth Day celebration at the Ecology Center, 2024 McCormick Blvd. Make nature art and discover great books to inspire kids to have fun and take action for the earth! Learn more.

Self-Organized Neighborhood Cleanup
Saturday April 23
Clean up a park or public space in your neighborhood. Volunteers can pick up gloves and trash bags at the Evanston Ecology Center, 20234 McCormick Blvd. or Robert Crown Community Centre, 1801 Main Street, starting Thursday, April 21.

Main-Dempster Mile Earth Day Cleanup
Saturday April 23 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Register to help clean up along the Main-Dempster Mile on Earth Day! All volunteers who help with the Earth Day cleanup will receive treats from neighborhood businesses.

Cleaning up the Kiwanis Club and ETHS for Earth Day
Saturday April 23 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.

After a two-year absence caused by the pandemic, the 102-year-old Kiwanis Club of Evanston will join with ETHS students and the ETHS Community Services Department to celebrate Earth Day. Students gather at ETHS at 9 a.m. where they register, have snacks provided by Kiwanis, including juice, fresh fruit, water, hot coffee, and donuts. They receive a t-shirt, gloves and bags which, at the end of the event, are filled with trash from the areas around the school.

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Shattered Innocence: Child abuse survivors share their stories | Community events https://crestviewna.org/shattered-innocence-child-abuse-survivors-share-their-stories-community-events/ Thu, 07 Apr 2022 22:45:00 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/shattered-innocence-child-abuse-survivors-share-their-stories-community-events/ Most often, the victims of sexual abuse are women. According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 5 women has been a victim of rape or attempted rape in her lifetime. For men, it’s a whole different story. This statistic is 1 in 38. One of those men is here […]]]>

Most often, the victims of sexual abuse are women. According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 5 women has been a victim of rape or attempted rape in her lifetime.

For men, it’s a whole different story. This statistic is 1 in 38.

One of those men is here in northern Alabama. For the first time, 40 years after the attack, he is sharing his story.

Randy Gautreau is 56 years old. He considers his childhood to be quite a happy one – he had a loving mother, a caring father and a special big brother.

This is what he shares with this brother he wishes he could forget.

“It’s a very violent act,” Gautreau said. “There were four guys – teenagers – from a neighborhood, and they were coming to choose us. They also have my brother.

Gautreau was raped at age 4.






Randy Gautreau and his brother share more than genetics. They were each violently abused as children. It’s something Gautreau wishes they didn’t share, and it’s something he’s now working hard to prevent from happening to anyone else.


“The others were participating by holding you back, something like that,” Gautreau recalled. “There were two places where these attacks would happen. They would only do one of us at a time.”

It’s a rape forgotten for 40 years.

“I come back in those episodes where I come back as this 4-year-old kid,” Gautreau said. “But I’m thrown back in. I’m immediately thrown back in where these guys hold you, stuff like that.”

Gautreau suffers from dissociative identity disorder, formerly known as multiple personality disorder. He suffers violent flashbacks that bring him back to his rape. At worst, they were happening every day. Now it’s more manageable. Gautreau said they perform about once a month.

“I always thought that kid was another kid,” Gautreau said, wiping away tears. I think that’s why it’s so important to talk about it.

From the time of her rape in the late 1960s until 2010, Gautreau was unaware that the rape had even taken place. It was such a violent act that his brain suppressed it. In 2010, 40 years after the attack, it was a conversation with his brother that brought everything back.

“I finally put together some stuff. So, I called my brother one night to kind of get yeses or noes, but not too detailed,” Gautreau said. “I’ll never forget that. At the end of the conversation, he said, ‘I was hoping they wouldn’t have touched you.’

A period of severe depression followed. Gautreau even nearly committed suicide. And all because of a new, fresh and horrible memory.

“The thing with the house was the mattress. You’re pressed against the mattress. You struggled to breathe when you were little. It’s like they didn’t care,” Gautreau recalled. “When they were done, they would have just leaned on you, standing up. It was like you were nothing.

Years of therapy, difficult conversations and self-realization then led to a new Randy Gautreau. A Randy Gautreau who helps others so that stories like his are a thing of the past and another child doesn’t have to go through the same thing.







Gautreau with Hajdasz

Randy Gautreau chats with WAAY 31’s Luke Hajdasz. After decades of silence, Gautreau shares her story in hopes that it will prevent another like her.


“People have to be so aware of what’s going on with their kids. It’s their family members. It’s people they trust doing this stuff. They may think, ‘Oh, they’re there. down with so-and-so, “but he’s a trustworthy person,” Gautreau said. “I don’t know what motivates these people. I don’t know how they can attack someone.”

At the time of Gautreau’s rape, the National Center for the Defense of Children was not even an idea, much less a reality. Knowing that a resource of this magnitude is here now brings comfort to Gautreau, as he knows that stories like his can only be told in the past tense one day.

“Having a place where the focus is on the child, the safety of the child, the future of the child, that’s so important,” Gautreau said.

Even though Gautreau didn’t get justice in his case, he said he was happy to know that the children in his place have more resources at their disposal.

The likelihood of a conviction







Great Alabama Seal

In the office of investigator Priscilla Padgett, the front page of a local newspaper is pinned to the wall.

“I’ll never forget sitting in court, and I’ll never forget a mother’s face to see tears and see her hold back, try to hold back without bursting out,” Padgett said. “It’s etched in my mind.”

On that first page is a headline about the indictment of a former Fort Payne teacher, who has since been convicted of sex crimes involving his own students. He has a twin brother – also a teacher – who has been implicated in similar crimes.

“The twin, the one who made a deal this week, he had one. There was a victim. A woman,” Padgett said.

The brothers each reached a plea deal, which reduced their time in jail. But any prison sentence is a victory for investigators and prosecutors.

Gabrielle Helix is ​​a domestic violence resource attorney for the Alabama Bureau of Prosecutions.

“Child abuse in general is a Class C felony,” Helix said. “They won’t go to prison for life.”

Helix assists 41 district attorney offices across the state. Previously, she was an assistant DA in Madison County, working at NCAC. She focused on prosecuting child abuse cases.

“When you isolate, heal, coerce, intimidate your victim to the point that it’s not a bar fight because you can’t fight back, you have this unequal balance of power, and to me, that’s the crime the most offensive of the justice system,” Helix said.

Yet Helix respects the legal system. She said she had to be realistic with each family.

“You know, as a mother, if someone hurt my child, I would want them under jail. Well, ‘under jail’ is not a punishment we have, but they won’t have life. , then it’s managing those expectations and helping them heal by connecting them with resources and so on,” Helix said, “to mitigate and manage the trauma, so that when we come to a disposition, they’re in a better place.

Even if there appears to be evidence, it may not be enough to convince a jury.

“So we have to get a case beyond a reasonable doubt, which is to say, we have to ask ourselves, ‘Is there acceptable evidence? .”







child abuse survivor

The National Children’s Advocacy Center works with survivors of child abuse to ensure they get the resources and support they need to move on and envision a bright future, free from abuse and harm. horrors they suffered.


For some victims, the priority may be getting the child to safety – a child like Kanea Tinker. Tinker lives with his aunt, Sonya Clemons, in DeKalb County. She remains there now, away from her accused abusers – her own father and mother.

“I just learned to deal with it, honestly,” Tinker said. “I never really knew when I was going to school. I never really knew what was going to happen when I got home.

Tinker said her parents have abused her emotionally and physically for as long as she can remember. When she was 11, her aunt and grandmother figured it out. They discovered bruises on Tinker’s body. They took photos and surrendered to the police.

“But when you take a board that you made and you whip a kid, if you want to call it ‘whipping’ – and they admitted she would get over 25 licks multiple times a day,” said Clemons. “She could’ve gotten 100 licks a day!

The parents were eventually charged with third-degree domestic violence, a misdemeanor. The Alabama Department of Human Resources placed Tinker with his aunt and uncle in December 2019.

“I see a future now more than I do,” Tinker said.

“She wants to go to college. She wants to be a veterinarian,” Clemons said. “She told me yesterday, if she can’t be a vet, she loves doing hair.”

Tinker has been healing for several years now. She loves volleyball, doing her hair, doing straight A’s and hanging out with friends. She said she finally felt at home and was asking her aunt and uncle to legally adopt her. They are a couple who never planned to have children but who have no regrets for having saved this brilliant young girl.

“I couldn’t thank them enough, honestly,” Tinker said.

Clemons said she would do anything to keep her niece safe.

“We just want her to know she is loved, she will never be abused. As long as my husband and I are alive, she will never be abused,” Clemons said.

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