Community volunteers – Crestview NA http://crestviewna.org/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 11:30:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://crestviewna.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-23-120x119.png Community volunteers – Crestview NA http://crestviewna.org/ 32 32 Mayor of Petrolia honors community volunteers https://crestviewna.org/mayor-of-petrolia-honors-community-volunteers/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 11:30:23 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/mayor-of-petrolia-honors-community-volunteers/ Content of the article Petrolia’s best and brightest volunteers were honored for their service at a September 29 town hall dinner. Content of the article Ninety-five people attended the annual City Volunteer Appreciation Dinner at the Petrolia Legion. A number of service club members, municipal committee members, Victoria Playhouse Petrolia volunteers and others were recognized […]]]>

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Petrolia’s best and brightest volunteers were honored for their service at a September 29 town hall dinner.

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Ninety-five people attended the annual City Volunteer Appreciation Dinner at the Petrolia Legion.

A number of service club members, municipal committee members, Victoria Playhouse Petrolia volunteers and others were recognized at the event. Mayor Brad Loosley presented Volunteer of the Year honors to four individuals, while presenting special recognition.

Community partner Susan Laker won one of the prizes. Laker was honored for her work with the Royal Canadian Legion Br. 216, the Ladies Auxiliary of 216, her work with the Petrolia Lions Club, her role in supporting Christmas Lunch for All, and her support of Bacofest.

Paul Gordon was honored for his contributions to the Community Services Advisory Committee, his volunteering for town events as well as the Petrolia Farmers’ Market, his advocacy for the youth of the community, his bus shuttle for the Canada and his lifelong support of Lambton County Developmental Services. .

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Roger Mailloux was recognized for his contribution to the Rotary Club of Pétrolia, to the board of directors of the Pétrolia Community Fund, as a founding member of the Charlotte Eleanor Englehart Hospital Foundation, his major gift to the Cataract Clinic Pat Mailloux of Pétrolia and his work on the Board of Directors of the Central Lambton Family Health Team.

Ross Ellsworth was honored for his work with the Petrolia Trails Committee, the Community Services Advisory Committee, as a key volunteer in the technical set-up of city events, as a member of the Lambton Central Petrolia Optimist Club and his help considerable with Victoria Playhouse Petrolia and the Petrolia Farmers Market.

Mayor Loosley gave special recognition to the Special Operations Response Team (SORT), which provides thousands of volunteer hours each year to support the Petrolia and North Enniskillen Fire Department and area residents responding to various emergencies.

Each of the winners received a certificate framed by the mayor as well as a glass award with an image of the city’s clock tower on the face, along with a bouquet of flowers.

“It is a pleasure for me to recognize these volunteers for their outstanding service to the town of Petrolia,” said Loosley. “I would also like, once again, to express my gratitude for each of you, and the role you play in making our city a well-known community, and for giving so freely of your time and expertise. We thank you.”

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The Bristol Press – Community volunteers cleaned Page Park in Bristol as part of ‘World Cleanup Day’ https://crestviewna.org/the-bristol-press-community-volunteers-cleaned-page-park-in-bristol-as-part-of-world-cleanup-day/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 16:27:57 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/the-bristol-press-community-volunteers-cleaned-page-park-in-bristol-as-part-of-world-cleanup-day/ BRISTOL – A group of community volunteers took the initiative to help clean up Page Park last Saturday as part of a ‘World Cleanup Day’ effort. Bill LaMonte, who was part of the group of volunteers, said they ranged in age from 5 to 60. Together, they helped remove 50 pounds of trash from trails, […]]]>

BRISTOL – A group of community volunteers took the initiative to help clean up Page Park last Saturday as part of a ‘World Cleanup Day’ effort.

Bill LaMonte, who was part of the group of volunteers, said they ranged in age from 5 to 60. Together, they helped remove 50 pounds of trash from trails, parking lots and the Page Park disc golf course.

“Although park rangers work diligently to maintain the park, it is clear that heavy foot traffic still leaves a carbon footprint throughout the year,” he said. “Unfortunately the most common items found during cleanup were cigarette butts, liquor bottles, plastic bags and plastic bottles. There was also a lot of broken glass throughout the trails that were difficult to remove. It is clear that our community still faces a problem of waste and litter management.”

LaMonte said that while the state of Connecticut is a leader in environmental initiatives, waste remains an issue.

“Even with its strict anti-litter law, instituted in 1992, many of our local streets and parks are still prone to litter of all types, making World Cleanup Day particularly important both to raise awareness of this issue and to also take action,” he said.

LaMonte encouraged visitors to Page Park to follow the city’s “take out and take out” policy and use designated trash cans to dispose of their trash.

“The park relies on the good nature of its visitors,” he said. “Although World Cleanup Day is an annual event, neighborhoods can still work together to improve their environment through neighborhood cleanups and education campaigns.”

Erica Benoit, community engagement co-ordinator with the Bristol Department of Parks, Recreation, Youth and Community Services, said she appreciated the proactive efforts of volunteers.

“This is an amazing group of people who have decided to help clean up one of our local parks,” she said. “We would love to help keep the momentum going.”

Benoit said the city will also be hosting a community cleanup in October. More information will be announced soon.

World Cleanup Day is a global initiative which aims to raise awareness of the global crisis of waste management – including litter, plastic pollution and toxins in the ground, water in the air. LaMonte said the initiative, which started in 2018, includes about 25 million people in 180 countries around the world.

Brian M. Johnson can be reached at 860-973-1806 or bjohnson@bristolpress.com.

Published in The Bristol Press, Bristol on Monday September 19, 2022 12:19 PM. Updated: Monday September 19, 2022 12:21.
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Rotary Club and Community Volunteers Pack 35,328 Food Servings at Meal of Hope Event Saturday – Los Alamos Reporter https://crestviewna.org/rotary-club-and-community-volunteers-pack-35328-food-servings-at-meal-of-hope-event-saturday-los-alamos-reporter/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 02:09:55 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/rotary-club-and-community-volunteers-pack-35328-food-servings-at-meal-of-hope-event-saturday-los-alamos-reporter/ More than 100 community members of all ages volunteered for the Rotary Club of Los Alamos “Meals of Hope” event on Saturday and by mid-afternoon, 35,328 servings of food were assembled and packed into boxes sealed, stacked and wrapped in plastic ready for pick-up. Monday morning by The Food Depot in Santa Fe. Food will […]]]>

More than 100 community members of all ages volunteered for the Rotary Club of Los Alamos “Meals of Hope” event on Saturday and by mid-afternoon, 35,328 servings of food were assembled and packed into boxes sealed, stacked and wrapped in plastic ready for pick-up. Monday morning by The Food Depot in Santa Fe. Food will be distributed to pantries throughout the region, including LA Cares in Los Alamos. Photo by Mayor O’Neill/losalamosreporter.com

Sophie Stewart, left, works with Rotary President Alison Pannell during the club’s Meals of Hope event at Crossroads Bible Church. Photo by Mayor O’Neill/losalamosreporter.com

Meals of Hope event coordinator Laura Gonzales, left, helps fill bags with rice and soy and other ingredients. The bags each contain six servings of food. Photo by Mayor O’Neill/losalamosreporter.com

Rotarian Skip King assembles cardboard boxes Saturday morning during the Rotary Meals of Hope foodpacking event at Crossroads Bible Church. Photo by Mayor O’Neill/losalamosreporter.com

Yunseo Kim, president of the Los Alamos High School Rotary Interact club, speaks at the start of the Meals of Hope food event Saturday sponsored by the Rotary Club of Los Alamos. Also pictured is Rotarian Laura Gonzales, event planner. Photo by Mayor O’Neill/losalamosreporter.com

Los Alamos County Council Chairman Randall Ryti and council candidate Teresa Cull prepare soybeans for food packets at the Rotary Club of Los Alamos Meals of Hope event on Saturday. Photo by Mayor O’Neill/losalamosreporter.com

Cheryl Pongratz, center, and other volunteers check in Saturday morning at the Meals of Hope event. Photo by Mayor O’Neill/losalamosreporter.com

Los Alamos Deputy Chief of Police and immediate past Rotary club president, left, and Rotarian Greg Viola assemble boxes Saturday morning at the Meals of Hope event. Photo by Mayor O’Neill/losalamosreporter.com

Volunteers work on an assembly line to wrap food packages for The Food Depot in Santa Fe. Photo by Maire O’Neill/losalamosreporter.com

Rotarian Brian Newnam places food packets in boxes for Meals of Hope. Photo by Mayor O’Neill/losalamosreporter.com

More volunteers at Saturday’s Meals of Hope event. Photo by Mayor O’Neill/losalamosreporter.com

Volunteers at Saturday’s Rotary Meals of Hope event. Photo by Mayor O’Neill/losalamosreporter.com

Volunteers at Saturday’s Rotary Meals of Hope event. Photo by Mayor O’Neill/losalamosreporter.com

Los Alamos County Council candidate James Wernicke helps out at the Meals of Hope event. Photo by Mayor O’Neill/losalamosreporter.com

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Community and Volunteers Gather for the 33rd Annual Surfside Beach River Sweep https://crestviewna.org/community-and-volunteers-gather-for-the-33rd-annual-surfside-beach-river-sweep/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 13:41:00 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/community-and-volunteers-gather-for-the-33rd-annual-surfside-beach-river-sweep/ SURFSIDE BEACH, SC (WMBF) – The 33rd Annual Beach Sweep/River Sweep Trash Cleanup is scheduled for Saturday, September 17 from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Keep Surfside Beach Beautiful is leading the effort at Surfside Beach and looking for volunteers. Those wishing to volunteer should meet the organizers at the 3rd Avenue North Beach Access […]]]>

SURFSIDE BEACH, SC (WMBF) – The 33rd Annual Beach Sweep/River Sweep Trash Cleanup is scheduled for Saturday, September 17 from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.

Keep Surfside Beach Beautiful is leading the effort at Surfside Beach and looking for volunteers.

Those wishing to volunteer should meet the organizers at the 3rd Avenue North Beach Access at Surfside Beach.

The groups dispersed on foot or by boat from the various cleanup sites and usually return with bags full of plastic and glass bottles, cans, food containers, clothing, toys and cigarette butts. Larger items include household appliances, vehicle tires and building materials.

As much debris as possible is recycled.

Bags and gloves will be provided to all participants.

The SC Sea Grant Consortium partners with the SC Department of Natural Resources to organize the statewide event, which is held in conjunction with the Ocean Conservancy International Coastal Cleanup.

Anyone can participate – individuals, families, schools, youth groups, civic and conservation clubs and businesses.

No pre-registration or registration is required for volunteers.

Complimentary coffee and refreshments will be provided by Benjamin’s Bakery. Attendees are also encouraged to bring non-perishable donations for the local food pantry, South Strand Helping Hand.

Last year, despite COVID-19, 2,255 volunteers cleared more than 20,000 pounds of debris, covering 161 miles statewide.

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County Hall will honor community volunteers | News, Sports, Jobs https://crestviewna.org/county-hall-will-honor-community-volunteers-news-sports-jobs/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 05:16:22 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/county-hall-will-honor-community-volunteers-news-sports-jobs/ When the Mifflin County Sports Hall of Fame meets Sept. 25 to induct five individuals and this year’s new team selection, two of the hall’s at-large members will receive special recognition for their decades of volunteer service to the within the local sports community. Both names are synonymous with Babe Ruth Baseball in […]]]>

When the Mifflin County Sports Hall of Fame meets Sept. 25 to induct five individuals and this year’s new team selection, two of the hall’s at-large members will receive special recognition for their decades of volunteer service to the within the local sports community.

Both names are synonymous with Babe Ruth Baseball in Mifflin County. Belleville manager Bill Corbin and unofficial league publicist and reporter Ray Wilde will receive the Volunteer Recognition Award, given only to HOF members with 20 or more years of community service.

Corbin has been associated with the local league for 44 years, 40 of which as a team manager. During that span, he compiled a league win-loss record of 646-362. Combined with his 118 playoff wins and 51 losses, his overall record stands at 764-413, giving him the most wins of any Babe Ruth manager in Pennsylvania.

He coached or managed 1,325 games, second in league history and in the state to Scott Reigle’s 1,369 games of Reedsville.

Among Corbin’s team accomplishments are five state titles, all with 13-year-old stars; 13 All-Star teams reaching the Pennsylvania Final Four (a record for Mifflin County managers); three teams in all four Mid-Atlantic finals, with his 2021 15-year-old taking the regional top spot and this year’s 14-year-old also finishing first. Moving to Eagle Pass, Texas last year, Corbin steered the 15-year-old to the national finalists.

His 15 Pennsylvania finals as a coach or manager, two as a coach and 13 as a manager, is also a Mifflin County Babe Ruth record.

Ray Wilde is no stranger to the sports pages of local newspapers. First scoring for the Belleville team in 1970, he also began that same year in a public relations role that continues to this day.

During this period, Wilde attended and provided sports coverage for 2,024 games, more or less a few, as Ray likes to put it. Since 1970, Ray has attended 890 of Babe Ruth’s 1,039 local entrants postseason games, mostly at his own time and expense.

Ray has largely compiled, produced and funded six media guides to local league history and statistics. He was also instrumental in creating post-season awards for locals and also helped establish the Pennsylvania Babe Ruth Hall of Fame.

Ray Wilde and Bill Corbin are enshrined in the State Hall of Fame.

Commenting on the award, HOF President Tim Searer said: “The Hall of Fame Directors are pleased to recognize these men for their long-term commitment to Babe Ruth Baseball in Mifflin County.”

Continuing he added, “As a meticulous compiler of league statistics and a journalist, Ray has kept the local league and its players in the public eye. His reports are something players, their families and the general public look forward to and greatly appreciate.

For Corbin, Searer offered these words, “As a successful coach of the Belleville franchise, as well as leading many of the league’s all-star teams to national, regional and national success, Bill’s countless hours of service have benefited hundreds of young players from Mifflin County baseball.”

Searer concluded: “While many lend their time and talents for brief periods, it is hard to imagine anyone surpassing these two as a volunteer for a single sports organization.

The five inductees that day will include Wendee Booher, Richard Gingrich, Joseph Heller, Harold “Junior” Powell and Ronald Sprecher. Team honors this year go to the 1963 Rothrock High School boys’ basketball team, PIAA Class C Champions, Mifflin County’s first team state champions.

The guest speaker will be five-time American collegiate wrestler Hayden Hidlay from Lewistown.

The induction festivities will begin at 4 p.m. on Sunday, September 25 at the Birch Hill Events Center with a social hour featuring food stations and a cash bar.

Tickets are available for everyone. Cost for members is $30, non-members $40. They can be purchased through mcsportshof.com – the Mifflin County Sports Hall of Fame website, or by mailing a check for the appropriate amount to HOF, PO Box 989, Lewistown, PA 17044. Please include the names of all the people present. Note – no paper ticket will be provided. Names will appear on a list at the door on the day of the event.




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Writing coaches are looking for volunteers from the Flathead Valley community https://crestviewna.org/writing-coaches-are-looking-for-volunteers-from-the-flathead-valley-community/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 08:05:03 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/writing-coaches-are-looking-for-volunteers-from-the-flathead-valley-community/ Writing Coaches of Montana seeks members of the Flathead County community to participate in its coaching program with a mission to help local students improve their writing skills. Specifically, the program aims to help students think critically about their writing assignments so that they can become confident and competent writers across multiple disciplines. No experience […]]]>


Writing Coaches of Montana seeks members of the Flathead County community to participate in its coaching program with a mission to help local students improve their writing skills. Specifically, the program aims to help students think critically about their writing assignments so that they can become confident and competent writers across multiple disciplines.

No experience is necessary as volunteers will learn about the curriculum and best practices for teaching writing while being trained by qualified individuals.

To volunteer, community members can attend a virtual training on Thursday, September 15 from 6-8:45 p.m. Email Writing Coaches Flathead Coordinator Jeanne Wdowin at jeanne@writingcoachesofmontana.org for more information. information. Or, visit writingcoachesofmontana.org and under “News and Events,” go to the public calendar, scroll forward to September 15, and sign up. WCM staff will be available for follow-up questions at any time.

During the 2022-23 school year, volunteers will coach in person at schools and, if needed, online using Google Meet. Coaches can choose their preference of in-person or virtual coaching when offered. In August 2020, in response to COVID-19, Writing Coaches of Montana developed an online coaching program that meets the student privacy requirements of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and uses Google Suite for Nonprofits.

During the 2021-2022 school year, Cassie Sheets, the program’s executive director, along with Jeanne Wdowin, flathead regional coordinator, led a coaching program in schools across Montana, including the following local schools: Whitefish High School , Whitefish Middle School, Columbia Falls High School, Kalispell Middle School, and Muldown Elementary School.

Heather Davis Schmidt, superintendent of the Target Range School District, says, “Writing coaches do more than support writing. They also build relationships with students, bridge generational gaps, provide positive perspectives from another trusted adult, and give hope to those who are struggling.

Community members interested in learning more about the program can visit writingcoachesofmontana.org or contact WCM staff.

Montana Writing Coaches began with Missoula County Public Schools in 1995, then expanded to Ravalli County in 2016 and Flathead County in 2019.

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Kingston police community volunteers seek new members as part of recruitment drive https://crestviewna.org/kingston-police-community-volunteers-seek-new-members-as-part-of-recruitment-drive/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 21:20:05 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/kingston-police-community-volunteers-seek-new-members-as-part-of-recruitment-drive/ Release date: September 1, 2022 Kingston Police Community Volunteers (KPCV) are looking for a few good people. We are a group of 70 uniformed citizens who assist the Kingston Police in non-confrontational activities. We act as extra eyes and ears for the Kingston Police. On patrol, we watch for anything out of the ordinary. We […]]]>

Release date: September 1, 2022

Kingston Police Community Volunteers (KPCV) are looking for a few good people. We are a group of 70 uniformed citizens who assist the Kingston Police in non-confrontational activities. We act as extra eyes and ears for the Kingston Police. On patrol, we watch for anything out of the ordinary. We would then contact the police dispatchers through our radios, and they would then send officers to deal with the problem.

We are also called upon to search for missing persons or evidence from a crime scene. Kingston Police Community Volunteers are a versatile force of citizens who work hand-in-hand with Kingston Police at over 80 special events and parades each year. We also support child identification and child car seat clinics to help make our community safer.

On Saturday, September 17, 2022 from 10:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Kingston Police Community Volunteers will be holding a recruitment session at Kingston Police Headquarters located at 705 Division Street. Displays will be set up to show the many activities in which volunteers participate. Applications can be picked up and/or completed on site, and members will be on hand to answer any questions you may have.

There are no membership fees or compensation for volunteer members of the Kingston Police Community. Applicants must pass a police check and hold a valid Class “G” driver’s license. The only other restriction is that you must be 18 or older. Members must commit to a minimum of eight hours of patrol and attend one meeting per month.

We are looking for community members who are interested in helping volunteer in the Kingston Police Community for a number of years and other than a minimum age requirement of 18 we have no upper age limit as long as you are able to fulfill the functions of the group.

For more information, call (613) 549-4660 ext. 2277 or email kpcvcoordinator@kpf.ca.

Applications are available online at www.kingstonpolice.ca, go to “Careers», then click on «Volunteering» and click on «KPCV request”. Alternatively, you can also come to the reception at Kingston Police Headquarters for a request. The cut-off for the 2023/2023 school year is September 30, 2022.

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Qualicum Beach Council honors community volunteers for exceeding expectations – Parksville Qualicum Beach News https://crestviewna.org/qualicum-beach-council-honors-community-volunteers-for-exceeding-expectations-parksville-qualicum-beach-news/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/qualicum-beach-council-honors-community-volunteers-for-exceeding-expectations-parksville-qualicum-beach-news/ St. Stephen’s Community Meals Program was honored at the Town of Qualicum Beach Volunteer Appreciation Reception held at the Qualicum Beach Civic Center on August 25th. The winners received the Above and Beyond Volunteer Award for their outstanding dedication to those in need throughout the Parksville Qualicum Beach area. They were chosen by the board […]]]>

St. Stephen’s Community Meals Program was honored at the Town of Qualicum Beach Volunteer Appreciation Reception held at the Qualicum Beach Civic Center on August 25th.

The winners received the Above and Beyond Volunteer Award for their outstanding dedication to those in need throughout the Parksville Qualicum Beach area.

They were chosen by the board and the staff.

Every week, rain or shine, those in need of a free meal and a kind word find the doors of St. Stephens Church open. Meals are freshly prepared with quality local ingredients that provide not only nutrition but also companionship — the program’s motto being, “Come for a meal, stay for the friendship.

The program has been around for over 15 years, and even thanks to COVID, it has provided take-out meal service. Now back to their normal Thursday lunch schedule, they serve between 30 and 50 people each week in person, in addition to providing an additional 70 sack lunches that social workers bring to people living in isolated rural areas.

They are also delighted to resume their monthly hot evening meal which pre-COVID attracted over 200 people, many of whom were seniors in need of socializing and simple human contact.

In addition to providing meals, the program offers social workers vital opportunities to provide in-person services and specialist support that would otherwise be difficult to arrange. The program also supports the KSS school lunch program both financially and with volunteer services.

Council, on behalf of the Qualicum Beach community, expressed their sincere thanks.

“The Volunteer Appreciation Reception is our opportunity to express our appreciation to the many volunteers who dedicate hours, days, months and even years to improving the Qualicum Beach community,” the board said.

Guests were also encouraged in this Year of the Garden to “continue to grow our community together. Alone we can do so little: together we can do so much.

The volunteer groups and committee members honored this year are listed on the 2022 Volunteer Appreciation Recipients Award displayed in the lobby of City Hall, as well as on the Above and Beyond Volunteer Award plaque.

— NEWS staff, submitted

As we on Facebook and follow we on Twitter

qualicum beach

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Community volunteers sit with Superintendent of Schools Webster – Minden Press-Herald https://crestviewna.org/community-volunteers-sit-with-superintendent-of-schools-webster-minden-press-herald/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 13:54:03 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/community-volunteers-sit-with-superintendent-of-schools-webster-minden-press-herald/ On Tuesday August 23, 2022, delegates and concerned citizens from the burgeoning community volunteer group known as Our Minden (#ourminden) sat down to discuss the events of the previous Friday at Minden Secondary School. The frantic emptying of the WW Williams Stadium during the Minden-Benton Scrimmage match made many in attendance realize that our community […]]]>

On Tuesday August 23, 2022, delegates and concerned citizens from the burgeoning community volunteer group known as Our Minden (#ourminden) sat down to discuss the events of the previous Friday at Minden Secondary School. The frantic emptying of the WW Williams Stadium during the Minden-Benton Scrimmage match made many in attendance realize that our community needed help. No one was harmed or hurt that night, but many wondered how this situation could happen back home. In the days that followed, parents and community leaders sprang into action and a grassroots effort emerged to provide potential solutions and ideas to help our schools and community.

The answer is refreshing. It’s easy in troubling times to point fingers and find a scapegoat to blame. However, this movement of parents and concerned members of the community did not seek blame. We have a community issue that has reluctantly seeped into our children’s schools. It has been a burden that our teachers and school administrators have had to carry for too long.

Minden High School currently has just under 800 students. The overwhelming majority of these students have hopes and dreams and are leveraging their high school experience to move into the next phase of their adult life. These students will become our next generation of fellow citizens, employees, entrepreneurs and civic leaders, and they will be great. However, Superintendent Rowland informed the gathering of concerned citizens that disruptive and disrespectful behavior in our classrooms by a small handful will not be tolerated.

The first step from the volunteers involved was to provide a list of potential immediate actions that could be taken to create a safer experience during football matches. Additionally, the group came up with ideas for providing volunteer support at events and even in the hallways of Minden High.

As community members and parents pondered potential solutions, our weary but unwavering administration and faculty shared their own ideas and strategies. In a series of meetings on Monday, school administrators, led by Superintendent Rowland, introduced the following immediate changes for school sporting events:

  • Metal detectors will be used by law enforcement at the gates for all home games in Webster Parish.
  • Each school in the parish will monitor its unique list of students NOT permitted to participate in events due to specific violations of school rules.
  • Law enforcement will be dispersed in the crowd at school events.
  • All bags brought to a school event by anyone must be clear and transparent.
  • At Minden High School, Ash Street will be closed during home games and monitored by law enforcement.

These changes will be visible across the parish starting this Thursday, August 25 at Minden High School’s Meet the Tide, then again on Friday, August 26 at the Pineland Jamboree hosted by Lakeside High School in Sibley. On behalf of all the voices concerned, we thank our school management for the rapid implementation of these actions.

Additional discussion also took place on longer term solutions. A major concern of teachers and parents is the presence of criminal activity infiltrating the hallways and classrooms of our schools. Over the past year and a half, the school system, in response to COVID-19 pandemic protocols, has developed and implemented effective alternative means of educating children. This allows violent or recidivist students to access an educational pathway that keeps them isolated and separate from the general school population.

Finally, the volunteer group discussed the possibility of parents and community volunteers assisting with hallway and event monitoring, particularly at Minden High School. Superintendent Rowland offered some advice and thoughts, and the volunteer group will organize an effort to make this happen. In short, the school system encourages the participation of parents and citizens. Student safety is of paramount importance, so any voluntary efforts within school walls will need to be controlled and coordinated.

What can you do to get involved in the conversation?

1. Join the “Our Minden” group on Facebook. www.facebook.com/groups/ourminden. This group serves as a base to share ideas and rally the community to make the changes we want to see. Also, support our students by ordering a new t-shirt: https://parishdesignco.com/products/ourminden-preorder.

2. Share the stories and articles promoting the solutions. As a community, we must not ignore problems, but we must conquer negativity and darkness with light and truth. Let’s share the good.

3. Commit to prayer. Pray with your church, Sunday school class, Bible study group, family, and friends. Several citizens hold prayer marches around the school property daily and weekly, and a pre-game prayer rally on Ash Street is scheduled for 6:00 p.m. before the home opener at MHS on September 9.

4. Get involved in the community. Attend events. Show up at city council meetings and school board meetings. Talk to your elected officials. Take an interest in how our community functions for better and for worse. You will discover ways to make a difference.

5. Support our community as a whole. Negativity is an easy way to get involved to make a difference. Pointing fingers and blaming others provides no value and gives individuals an excuse to shirk their own responsibility.

It’s our community. We are Minden. It’s #ourmind.

Jeff Rhodes, Community volunteer and parent

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Community Volunteer Rehabilitation Youth Treatment Center | https://crestviewna.org/community-volunteer-rehabilitation-youth-treatment-center/ Wed, 17 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/community-volunteer-rehabilitation-youth-treatment-center/ Community leaders have helped Desert Lily Academy bloom again. The academy renovation was the latest class project of the City of Queen Creek’s Citizen Leadership Institute, which graduated 38 participants earlier this month. The CLI program educates community members about city government through hands-on participation in the community. This is the first promotion since the […]]]>

Community leaders have helped Desert Lily Academy bloom again.

The academy renovation was the latest class project of the City of Queen Creek’s Citizen Leadership Institute, which graduated 38 participants earlier this month.

The CLI program educates community members about city government through hands-on participation in the community. This is the first promotion since the pandemic.

“We had the opportunity to refresh and redecorate the girls’ cabin at Desert Lily Academy,” said Tabetha Denman-Geideman.

Participants spent two days restoring Dignity Cottage located on the Canyon State Academy campus at 20061 E. Rittenhouse Road.

“Our goal was to provide them with a visually appealing, welcoming, comfortable, calming and safe space to do so,” Denman said.

Girls between the ages of 11 and 18 spend their first 30 days in the admissions room when they enter the residential treatment program at Desert Lily Academy.

The women-specific program helps dozens of girls identify the reasons for their disruptive behaviors and develop coping skills to overcome trauma, sometimes including a history of being victims of human trafficking.

Denman presented her project to the Queen Creek Town Council at its August 3 meeting and said how happy and grateful the girl was for the transformation.

“In fact, the design was so impactful that they recently found out they were planning to paint all the remaining cabins with the paint color and the chalk wall we did in this room,” Denman said.

From January to July, CLI attendees attended 10 sessions that encompassed all aspects of city government, including its history, public services, public safety, and the parks and recreation department.

To complete the program, participants had to attend at least seven out of 10 sessions, as well as attend a city council meeting, attend a city commission meeting, volunteer at an event or program organized by the city and participate in a class service project.

The service project served as the culmination of the seven-month program and tested participants’ skills and teamwork.

The whole group of participants divided into two teams: one for the renovations and one for collecting donations.

The renovation team met some of the girls over ice cream courtesy of Kolnick and got their thoughts on what renovations they should do.

Todd Seymore said the project also installed tinted windows to keep the girls cool, among other ideas.

“We also used inspirational quotes which would also help them see past some of their issues,” Seymore said.

Nick and Jen Masse of RZR AZ, a Facebook group for local off-road enthusiasts, donated all the paint the group would use with some left over to continue painting in other rooms, Seymore said.

“The service project was huge,” Joe Kolnick said. “Just being able to help a group of underprivileged girls who are facing big problems.”

Joe Kolnick has lived in Queen Creek for 20 years and owns the Cold Stone Creamery located at 7507 South Power Road, Suite 104.

This was Kolnick’s first time participating in the CLI program and he said what he remembered the most was this service project.

Kolnick donated more than $2,100 in materials for the project, including painting supplies, furniture, window coverings and electronics.

He said the project made him realize how much such a small gesture can mean to people going through a tough time.

“We take a lot for granted and thinking about the disadvantaged in our society is…huge,” Kolnick said. “We have to have that safety net.”

The second group coordinated a donation campaign for various “must-have” items, including art supplies, sporting goods and books.

Some of the items included sketchbooks, colored pencils, books of varying reading levels, and a tetherball pole that they had specifically requested.

“Collecting these needed supplies was vital to Canyon State Academy’s ability to advance its mission and improve the lives of young people and grow its organization,” said Sergio Samora.

Danielle McGinn said the group used social media to publicize the items and created an Amazon wishlist for items the academy needed.

“We had over 200 items on our list that were donated,” she said. “About 90% of this list has been completed.”

The group coordinated online and through multiple drop-off points around town, including the library, police station, civic center, and then local businesses.

Both groups thanked everyone involved with the project and said they felt inspired to continue serving the community.

“I also want to give special thanks to Amber Gough for leading the Citizens Leadership Institute,” Samora said. “And we also look forward to seeing what others can achieve in the future.”

Amber Gough is the Outreach Specialist for the program and said attendees learned about the city’s programs, infrastructure and services.

“All of our Citizen Leaders are passionate about learning more about the city,” Gough said.

Gough said the biggest personal benefit came in the form of networking among fellow citizens.

“Collectively, they all want to find ways to get involved and have a positive impact,” Gough said.

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