Neighborhood councils – Crestview NA http://crestviewna.org/ Mon, 08 Nov 2021 19:59:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://crestviewna.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-23-120x119.png Neighborhood councils – Crestview NA http://crestviewna.org/ 32 32 City of Springfield announces funding for neighborhood councils to increase community participation https://crestviewna.org/city-of-springfield-announces-funding-for-neighborhood-councils-to-increase-community-participation/ https://crestviewna.org/city-of-springfield-announces-funding-for-neighborhood-councils-to-increase-community-participation/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 13:46:38 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/city-of-springfield-announces-funding-for-neighborhood-councils-to-increase-community-participation/ SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WWLP) – The city of Springfield has funding to help increase awareness and participation of residents on neighborhood councils. A pilot program funded by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts assigned the Office of Disaster Recovery the task of soliciting proposals under the Municipal Vulnerability Preparedness program. The City will provide funding of up to […]]]>

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WWLP) – The city of Springfield has funding to help increase awareness and participation of residents on neighborhood councils.

A pilot program funded by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts assigned the Office of Disaster Recovery the task of soliciting proposals under the Municipal Vulnerability Preparedness program. The City will provide funding of up to $ 10,000 per neighborhood council.

Mayor Domenic Sarno, Director of Development Timothy Sheehan, Director of Disaster Recovery Tina Quagliato-Sullivan and Deputy Director of Neighborhood Services Ed Whitley announced the notice of funding availability and the request for proposals to increase the awareness raising and participation in neighborhood councils.

These proposals should demonstrate how a neighborhood council would use the funding to increase residents’ awareness and participation in council activities. Organizations interested in submitting proposals can obtain the documents from the Procurement Office, by contacting Lauren Stabilo at lstabilo@springfieldcityhall.com. All proposals are due before November 8, 2021 at 2:00 p.m.

Strategies should focus on environmental justice areas and populations as defined by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in particular:

  • A group of US census blocks with median annual household income equal to or less than 65% of the statewide median ($ 62,072 in 2010); Where
  • 25% or more of residents identify as a race other than white; Where
  • 25% or more of households have no one over 14 who speaks English only or very well – English Isolation

Mayor Sarno says, “My administration often uses our neighborhood councils as the primary point of two-way communication with residents and neighborhoods and these councils frequently serve as the voice of our many diverse citizens and populations. We recognize that in order to build Springfield’s resilience and respond effectively to disaster situations, we must ensure that these lines of communication are extensive and effective before an actual disaster occurs. I am grateful to Governor Charlie Baker, Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito and Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs Kathleen Theoharides for providing this funding which will allow our neighborhood councils to reach more residents and communities. invite more residents to participate in the civic process.


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Westside Neighborhood Councils call for action on anti-camping ordinance https://crestviewna.org/westside-neighborhood-councils-call-for-action-on-anti-camping-ordinance/ https://crestviewna.org/westside-neighborhood-councils-call-for-action-on-anti-camping-ordinance/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 06:03:55 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/westside-neighborhood-councils-call-for-action-on-anti-camping-ordinance/ WRAC Board of Directors Passes Two Motions Relating to Camping in Public Spaces By Dolores Quintana The Westside Regional Alliance of Councils or the WRAC Board of Directors passed a motion that could eventually be voted on in fourteen community and neighborhood councils. The council seeks to force the LA city council to enforce the […]]]>

WRAC Board of Directors Passes Two Motions Relating to Camping in Public Spaces

By Dolores Quintana

The Westside Regional Alliance of Councils or the WRAC Board of Directors passed a motion that could eventually be voted on in fourteen community and neighborhood councils. The council seeks to force the LA city council to enforce the rules of the new anti-camping ordinance passed by the council and intended to end homeless settlements in various public spaces.

For the terms of the ordinance to be enforced, LA city council must vote to approve every action taken against any encampment or anyone violating the ordinance by resolution. After a resolution is passed, anti-camping signs can be posted and after 14 days the city can then impose fines to enforce compliance and as a punishment.

This new ordinance replaces the previous version of Municipal Code 41.18 and now prohibits “… sitting, lying down or sleeping, or storing, using, maintaining or placing personal property” of a manner that obstructs public use or access to public streets, sidewalks or other types of public structures or private property. There is a clause that also prevents the same with specific places related to the presence of children designated as sensitive use such as in “a school, daycare, public park or public library”.

This WRAC board motion attempts to pressure LA city council members who represent the areas WRAC represents – Mike Bonin, Paul Koretz, Nithya Raman and Mark Ridley-Thomas – to work with the councils neighborhood to identify areas that require enforcement of the ordinance, then present resolutions to city council as soon as possible to speed up enforcement of the ordinance on designated sites. The motion specifies, however, that offers of accommodation must first be made and refused by the inhabitants of the camps before the execution is carried out. Of the four city council members who represent the WRAC region, two of them were the only city council members to vote against the ordinance, Bonin and Raman.

Another motion that was passed by the WRAC board is a motion to support the proposed resolution written by City Council member Joe Buscaino and seconded by Paul Koretz that would ban campsites near all schools in the city of Los Angeles and that signs be posted near all schools. buildings, at the approved distance of 500 feet, to warn anyone attempting to camp there to stay away from school grounds. The resolution can be read here.

Both motions were drafted by WRAC Homelessness Committee (HOC) Chair Jay Handel and Vice Chair Chris Spitz. The motion is available for reading on Westside Councils.com. This motion was passed by the Pacific Palisades Community Council (PPCC) and the PPCC sent a list of schools, daycares, public parks and libraries in their area to City Council member Mike Bonin asking him to write a resolution. for the City council members will vote to designate all of these sites as sensitive uses in order to enforce the ordinance. The letter was sent on September 12 and, so far, Mike Bonin has not responded.

WRAC Vice President Spitz was quoted by Westside Current.com as saying that “the burgeoning homeless settlements in the public right of way are THE current problem in Los Angeles. Protecting our children and supporting our schools are priorities for the vast majority of WRAC members with families. A swift follow-up by Bonin and other WRAC board members – to work with WRAC member boards and bring resolutions to LA city council to enable the ordinance to be enforced – would be consistent with these priorities. “


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Policy 101: Neighborhood Tips – Los Angeles Standard Newspaper https://crestviewna.org/policy-101-neighborhood-tips-los-angeles-standard-newspaper/ https://crestviewna.org/policy-101-neighborhood-tips-los-angeles-standard-newspaper/#respond Sun, 29 Aug 2021 21:49:13 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/policy-101-neighborhood-tips-los-angeles-standard-newspaper/ The LA Standard Newspaper needs your support so that we can continue to create positive stories about black communities. $ 20, $ 50, $ 100, $ 500, $ 1,000. Any amount would be greatly appreciated. -Jason Douglas Lewis, owner / publisher. Donations can be made via Cash App https://cash.app/$LAStandard, Venmo https://venmo.com @ LA-Standard-Newspaper, PayPal https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/lastandardnewspaper […]]]>
The LA Standard Newspaper needs your support so that we can continue to create positive stories about black communities. $ 20, $ 50, $ 100, $ 500, $ 1,000. Any amount would be greatly appreciated. -Jason Douglas Lewis, owner / publisher. Donations can be made via Cash App https://cash.app/$LAStandard, Venmo https://venmo.com @ LA-Standard-Newspaper, PayPal https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/lastandardnewspaper and GoFundMe https://www.gofundme.com/f/support-blackowned-los-angeles-standard-newspaper

Over the next few months, the LA Standard will be publishing articles on the political process. The series introduces the different levels of politics, including neighborhood councils, city council members, mayors, county supervisors, state assembly members, state senators, governor, members of the United States Congress and the President of the United States. The purpose of this series is to highlight what each politician does, which politicians people should contact for various issues and how people can participate in the political process.

The Park Mesa Heights Community Council welcomes political candidates at their monthly meetings. Photos of Jason Lewis

By Jason Lewis

Neighborhoods are constantly changing and problems will always arise, causing community members to wonder who is making the decisions or why certain developments are happening. While most people don’t run for political office, anyone who cares about what’s going on in their neighborhood can find ways to get involved.

Neighborhood councils can be an entry point into the political process. In the city of Los Angeles, the Empowerment Congress was established in 1992 by Mark Ridley-Thomas, a member of the Los Angeles City Council. Each municipal district has its own neighborhood council.

“As a longtime resident and elected official, I deeply appreciate that participatory democracy requires all of us to engage in civic life,” said Ridley-Thomas. “Neighborhood councils play a vital role in ensuring that community members have a voice in municipal government. They advocate for critical issues such as homelessness, housing, public safety, and provide a powerful example of how to build and unify communities by creating opportunities to educate, engage and empower residents. .

Lots of people are speaking out on social media about the issues they see in their communities, but that’s not the platform to bring about the changes people want to see.

“A lot of times you’ll see people leaving on Facebook or Nextdoor,” said Gina Fields, chair of the Empowerment Council West Area Neighborhood Development Council, which covers Baldwin Hills and Leimert Park. “Okay, you can complain about that if that’s your goal. But if your goal is really to solve the problem and try to move the neighborhood forward in a positive way, you need to get involved. You can’t just sit at home with your thumbs typing negative things on your phone about what’s going on in your neighborhood.

An LAPD officer presents a report at the West District Development Council meeting of the Empowerment Council. Police officers and city officials present monthly reports and answer questions from community members at neighborhood council meetings.

Neighborhood councils act as an intermediary between the municipal district and the city, and they can strongly influence the policies and programs that the member of the municipal council in their district creates. But one problem that some neighborhood councils have is participation. According to KimMarie Johnson-Roussell, chair of the Park Mesa Heights Community Council, which covers Hyde Park, View Heights and Angeles Mesa, there are about 40,000 people in their municipal district, but only 89 people voted in their recent election, and only about twenty people participate regularly.

“These neighborhood councils where people are running (in greater number) in the elections of the neighborhood councils, the councilors of these neighborhoods tend to participate more in the community than those who do not have such a large participation”, he said. she declared.

“Westchester Community Council has a range of lawyers on its council. When it comes to planning and land use, due to the strong presence of lawyers and their ability to be above the city councilor, they are heard. Just about whatever they come up with, their city councilor works with them because not only do they have a bigger voice, but they also have a powerful voice. At Park Mesa Heights, we have lawyers and skilled people who can roll up their sleeves and get things done. “

Development is a big topic in South Los Angeles, as luxury condominiums and high-priced apartments spring up along the Crenshaw / LAX Metro track. Many blacks take this as a sign of gentrification and feel caught off guard when they find out that a new development has already been approved. People can stay more informed and have more influence over development by participating with their local neighborhood council, including through their Land Use Planning and Beautification (PLUB) committees.

“There is so much going on in our area,” said Fields. “There is so much development. The Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza; there are new buildings coming throughout Crenshaw every day. There is a plan within two years to develop more than 3,000 residential units in our region. It brings a lot more people to our region. Potentially 6,000-7,000 more people. This puts a strain on our infrastructure. This poses parking and traffic problems. Our objective, particularly with our planning, development and beautification committee, is therefore to ensure that development impacts us positively rather than negatively. One of those ways is to make sure that we work with the developers so that when they get to the neighborhood, that they hire locally, that they provide affordable housing so that the people who live in the area can continue to inhabit the region.

“A lot of developers are forced to come to a planning and land use committee meeting and tell us what the plans are; tell us what their ideas are on what they are building. And then listen to what we want and what we need. This is one of the most powerful things we have is our PLUB committee. If people really care about how our neighborhood is developing and moving forward, I urge them to attend these PLUB meetings, to really hear what is being built, and to really express their opinions.

In some cases, neighborhood councils have to kick a developer out of their community.

“We play with these developers as they come in,” Johnson-Roussell said. “Our town planning and land use planning committee is very aware of everything that is planned in the community.

Neighborhood councils organize community cleanups and other events to improve their neighborhoods. Above, the Park Mesa Heights Community Council is conducting a cleanup near the Van Ness Recreation Center.

Neighborhood councils help solve problems. Empowerment Council West worked with Councilmember Ridley-Thomas to house 75 homeless people who lived around Lemiert Park. The Park Mesa Heights Community Council runs community cleanups to help pick up trash in their neighborhoods. Cars on Crenshaw Boulevard have been a problem for decades, causing many complaints to locals. Neighborhood councils can work with law enforcement, local businesses, and community organizers to ensure that cultural events can take place without causing problems.

“We understand that it’s part of the culture, but we also have to keep it safe,” Fields said. “So it’s about finding a way that classic cars can exist there, but without the people making donuts in the middle of the street. We prefer the neighborhood to work together on these positive changes, rather than having people calling the police against each other. “

The closure of Ralph’s on Crenshaw Boulevard and Slauson Avenue has left Hyde Park and Angeles Mesa without a major grocery store story. So the Park Mesa Heights Community Council stepped in to bring attention to the issue so that it could be resolved. Ralph’s still owns the lease for the location, Johnson-Roussell says, but they won’t release it, preventing building owners from finding a new grocery tenant. The Park Mesa Heights Community Council is working to raise awareness of this issue so their neighborhood can once again have access to fresh food.

The Park Mesa Heights Community Council held a protest at Ralphs’ house on Crenshaw Boulevard and Slauson Avenue after the grocery store was announced to be closed. The neighborhood council is working with the municipal authorities to create a new store there.

Local politicians usually attend neighborhood council meetings or send a staff member to report and answer questions. This gives community members a chance to interact with their local political representative. Los Angeles Police Department officers and city officials also present reports and answer questions at these meetings.

View Park-Windsor Hills is part of Los Angeles County and therefore not part of the City of Los Angeles Neighborhood Council System. The United Homeowners Association II defends their cause. Ladera Heights is also part of Los Angeles County, and they have the Ladera Heights Civic Association.

Meetings of the local neighborhood council

-Hyde Park, Angeles Mesa, view of the heights– 2nd Saturday, 10 a.m., Angeles Mesa Elementary School, 2611 W. 52nd St. Contact: (323) 421-6250, This e-mail address is protected from spam. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., www.parkmesaheights.org
-Leimert Park, Baldwin Hills– 1st Saturday, 9:30 a.m., Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza
www.ecwandc.org, This e-mail address is protected from spam. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
-West Adams– 3rd Monday, 6:30 p.m., Vineyard Recreation Center, 2942 Vineyard Ave. Contact: (323) 451-9262, www.westadamsnc.org, This e-mail address is protected from spam. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
-Arlington Heights, Jefferson Park– 1st Thursday, 6:30 p.m., local Council District 10 office, 1819 S. Western Ave. Contact: (323) 731-8686, www.unnc.org, This e-mail address is protected from spam. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
-Mid City– 2nd Monday, 6:30 p.m., LAPD Wilshire Division Community Hall, 4849 Venice Blvd. Contact: (323) 732-5085, www.mincla.org, This e-mail address is protected from spam. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
-View Park, Windsor Hills– 4th Saturday, 2 p.m., Park Hills Community Church Fellowship, 5245 Overdale Dr. Contact: (323) 248-1699, www.uhawhvp.org, This e-mail address is protected from spam. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
-Ladera Heights– Contact: (424) 256-5422, www.laderaheights.org, This e-mail address is protected from spam. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


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Neighborhood councils are the voice of local residents in Los Angeles – NBC Los Angeles https://crestviewna.org/neighborhood-councils-are-the-voice-of-local-residents-in-los-angeles-nbc-los-angeles/ https://crestviewna.org/neighborhood-councils-are-the-voice-of-local-residents-in-los-angeles-nbc-los-angeles/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/neighborhood-councils-are-the-voice-of-local-residents-in-los-angeles-nbc-los-angeles/ The City of Los Angeles has 99 community groups tasked with making recommendations to city council members and ensuring that neighbors’ voices are heard. These are the so-called neighborhood councils, which play an important role in trying to improve the problems in their communities. “They have a very special relationship with the city, with the […]]]>

The City of Los Angeles has 99 community groups tasked with making recommendations to city council members and ensuring that neighbors’ voices are heard.

These are the so-called neighborhood councils, which play an important role in trying to improve the problems in their communities.

“They have a very special relationship with the city, with the city council, which gives them a very special space to bring the opinions and voices of communities to the city council,” said Raquel Beltrán, head of the district service of the city. of Los Angeles.

Any LA resident can serve on these boards, regardless of age or immigration status. Each council has about 12 representatives.

Members of these community groups are elected by vote.

To participate in the elections, you must live in the geographic area that belongs to your neighborhood council or own a business in that area.

“They are locally elected. They are civil servants, but they are volunteers, ”Beltrán said.

But community participation in these councils is also important, including attending their meetings.

“Power comes from the number of people who attend meetings and get involved in the issue that is presented to city council,” Beltrán said. “[It] is great, super important just to attend, because that way you give your opinion to your neighborhood council. “

For more information on how to be a part of these boards or participate as members of the community, click here.

For a list of neighborhood tips in the city of Los Angeles, click here.

This story first appeared on NBCLA’s sister station, Telemundo 52. Haz clic aquí para leer esta historia in español.


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San Pedro Neighborhood Councils Support Proposal to Allow ‘Safe’ Homeless Camping in 2 LA Harbor Parking Lots – Daily Breeze https://crestviewna.org/san-pedro-neighborhood-councils-support-proposal-to-allow-safe-homeless-camping-in-2-la-harbor-parking-lots-daily-breeze/ https://crestviewna.org/san-pedro-neighborhood-councils-support-proposal-to-allow-safe-homeless-camping-in-2-la-harbor-parking-lots-daily-breeze/#respond Thu, 11 Mar 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/san-pedro-neighborhood-councils-support-proposal-to-allow-safe-homeless-camping-in-2-la-harbor-parking-lots-daily-breeze/ Two neighborhood councils in San Pedro suggest that two port-owned parking lots, E and F, at 22nd Street. be used to set up an emergency and temporary sanctioned homeless campsite in San Pedro on Tuesday March 9, 2021. Some port officials and residents oppose this idea. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram / SCNG) Two harbor-owned […]]]>

A proposal to use two overwhelmed and mostly empty parking lots near the former village of Ports O’Call as a safe camping site for the homeless has been in discussion in San Pedro this month, but until ‘now she has been turned away by the landowner – the Port of Los Angeles.

Supporters from two San Pedro neighborhood councils say the area – Lots E and F, near 208 E. 22nd St. – could provide organized camping space for almost everyone who currently lives on the streets and streets. sidewalks in the city of Los Angeles.

The secure parking model would include assigned spaces, services available to help people find shelter and help, and amenities such as portable toilets and showers.

Like temporary shelters, this would also be a low barrier model that would allow people to come and go.

But port officials say the parking lots have other uses.

Port of Los Angeles executive director Gene Seroka told a recent harbor commission meeting that the lots are being used as drop zones for the ongoing construction of the promenade and town plaza. Both are necessary infrastructure that will connect to the new waterfront development, West Harbor, which is slated to lead the way this year and open in 2022.

And the lots are still used occasionally, he said, by the San Pedro fish market or other businesses in the area that need additional parking.

The lots are also close to a former “Superfund” industrial site, the GATX terminal, which has now disappeared but still fenced for surveillance, Seroka added.

“The last thing we wanted was to put every human being at risk from polluted sites and that is what it is,” he said of initial discussions with Los Angeles Mayor Garcetti on the research. temporary shelter sites.

And Seroka also noted that two temporary Bridge Home shelters, in San Pedro and Wilmington, currently have openings.

“Let’s get people to these facilities first,” he said.

The coronavirus pandemic has hit temporary shelters in the city and county of Los Angeles hard over the past year, forcing quarantines and barring any new residents for weeks at a time. Many residents have left, not wanting to go into confinement in shelters. Others who stayed lost new jobs they had just landed.

Supporters of the San Pedro Central and Coastal Neighborhood Councils, however, say using these parking lots as campgrounds would provide better access to personal assistance, including more permanent housing.

Both councils passed resolutions supporting the proposal to use the parking lots as campgrounds. The councils sent the resolutions to Seroka, the Los Angeles Harbor Board of Commissioners and LA 15th District Councilor Joe Buscaino.

“San Pedro is in urgent need of a safe and clean space,” wrote Doug Epperhart, president of the Coastal San Pedro Neighborhood Council, in this group’s resolution, “which gives dignity to our homeless neighbors who are currently living on sidewalks, boardwalks and streets in our community., mainly in our central neighborhood of Sn Pedro, with no temporary toilets.

San Pedro resident James Campeau said the lots, which he said could accommodate a hundred or more people, offer a promising solution to what has become a growing presence of homeless people on the streets of the neighborhood. business of San Pedro.

“I hate that homeless people are yelled at all the time,” he said. “Land is quite difficult to find. “


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LA neighborhood council election deadlines start tomorrow https://crestviewna.org/la-neighborhood-council-election-deadlines-start-tomorrow/ https://crestviewna.org/la-neighborhood-council-election-deadlines-start-tomorrow/#respond Mon, 08 Mar 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/la-neighborhood-council-election-deadlines-start-tomorrow/ Los Angeles City Neighborhood Council elections are in full swing this week. Tomorrow is the first deadline for people who wish to vote in the first group of NC elections. This year, the NC elections are grouped into 12 different regional groups; the oldest region, number 5, includes: Hollywood Center East Hollywood Grand Wilshire West […]]]>

Los Angeles City Neighborhood Council elections are in full swing this week. Tomorrow is the first deadline for people who wish to vote in the first group of NC elections.

This year, the NC elections are grouped into 12 different regional groups; the oldest region, number 5, includes:

  • Hollywood Center
  • East Hollywood
  • Grand Wilshire
  • West Hollywood Hills
  • Hollywood Studios District
  • Hollywood united
  • Mid-City West, and
  • PICO

This year’s elections are all mail-in ballots. Angelenos must request an online ballot stating that they are party to a specific NC (note: some councils require submitting a photo of photo ID and possibly other documents.) stakeholders can include people who live, work, attend religious institutions or whose family members go to school within the limits of a given NC. The deadline to apply for a Region 5 ballot is tomorrow – Tuesday March 9.

While many neighborhood councils are relatively regressive nimbys, a few have exercised their power in positive ways. Prominent among progressive councils, the Mid-City West Community Council has championed bike lanes, slow streets, Park (ing) Day, and walking / cycling improvements on Melrose that were overturned by City Council member Paul Koretz .

This year, several community groups – including LA Forward Action, Democratic Socialists of America and Streets for All – worked together to elect progressive NC lists. Streets for All has approved Mid City West, PICO, East Hollywood, Greater Wilshire and Hollywood Hills West City Council races. Additional group approvals can be found on the LA Forward Action and Democratic Socialist of America websites.

The Mid-City West Progressive List has created its own website and step-by-step instructional document for the 2021 NC election.

If you are unsure which neighborhood council represents you, use the NC town map web page to locate yours.

Even outside of Region 5, all stakeholders can apply for your relevant NC ballot online – again, for some this requires photo ID and in some cases additional documents.

Find various electoral links NC on the electoral portal of the district council of the city.


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LA Neighborhood Councils Must Respect Gender Identity: LA City Council Requires Training https://crestviewna.org/la-neighborhood-councils-must-respect-gender-identity-la-city-council-requires-training/ https://crestviewna.org/la-neighborhood-councils-must-respect-gender-identity-la-city-council-requires-training/#respond Wed, 24 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/la-neighborhood-councils-must-respect-gender-identity-la-city-council-requires-training/ Share this article: Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously on Wednesday to add gender identity and gender expression training to the diversity, equity and inclusion training of Los Angeles neighborhood councils , and individual neighborhood councils will have additional training if they have a board member or community member actively involved. who made the transition […]]]>

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Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously on Wednesday to add gender identity and gender expression training to the diversity, equity and inclusion training of Los Angeles neighborhood councils , and individual neighborhood councils will have additional training if they have a board member or community member actively involved. who made the transition or made it known that they changed their name or preferred pronouns.

“The neighborhood council system must be a place of welcome where all those who wish to participate are treated with dignity and respect. Unfortunately, that’s not always the case, ”said Councilor Bob Blumenfield, who introduced the motion, before the vote.

“This article responds to how a youth was treated in a neighborhood council in my district based on their gender identity and gender expression.”

Blumenfield said he hopes the mandatory training for all neighborhood councils will help prevent people from treating others with disrespect, instead of just tackling a problem when it arises.

“It is important that the Department of Neighborhood Empowerment do this so that the neighborhood council and its board members do the right thing and do not create problems from the start, rather than waiting for a problem to arise.

The motion sought to improve on Councilor Mike Bonin’s motion, which was approved last summer, to create diversity, equity and inclusion training for neighborhood councils.

Councilor Mitch O’Farrell thanked Blumenfield at the meeting for the addition, calling it “a big improvement over the original motion.”

O’Farrell also spoke of an initiative to get all city departments to receive similar training, which he said is in the works.

“Many years ago, within this Council, I introduced an initiative that requires mandatory training in terms of awareness and sensitivity to transgender people for all city departments, all elected officials, all members of the elected officials, and that includes the Neighborhood Empowerment Department, and that training is under development as we speak and should be ready for imminent deployment, ”said O’Farrell.

LA Neighborhood Councils Must Respect Gender Identity: LA City Council Requires Training was last modified: February 24, 2021 through Contributing editor

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The Right Stuff: Consider Neighborhood Tips https://crestviewna.org/the-right-stuff-consider-neighborhood-tips/ https://crestviewna.org/the-right-stuff-consider-neighborhood-tips/#respond Mon, 09 Nov 2020 12:54:35 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/the-right-stuff-consider-neighborhood-tips/ Delon Jackson: The Good Things The notion of politicians versus statesmen has been debated in society since the dawn of time; it is no different from wants versus needs. What do I mean? In politics we see two types of officials: a politician and the other is called a statesman. Everyone is an official sworn […]]]>

The notion of politicians versus statesmen has been debated in society since the dawn of time; it is no different from wants versus needs. What do I mean? In politics we see two types of officials: a politician and the other is called a statesman. Everyone is an official sworn to serve the people.

However, the character of a politician is different from that of a statesman.

Politicians do not seek the needs of the people but the needs of special interests. Their character varies in their commitment to individuals and interest groups; politicians are attached to their party and are re-elected. Statesmen are the opposite; they are looking for things to better serve people now and in the future; they are committed to listening and serving the people.

An example is a person who wants something, knowing that they don’t need it, but would do whatever it takes to get it. When a person really needs something, it is an absolute need for life and freedom.

Politicians today work for what they want, but in reality they are fooling people into believing they need it. As a people, we have to come back to the needs of the people, not the wants of politicians. To be the best statesman, you have to be prepared to be willing to disagree with the opinions of others and be able to accept another person’s opinion, especially when that opinion benefits the people you serve.

The concept of having a neighborhood council in every neighborhood is to keep your city council in control and on the job for the people. One voice should never make the difference in choices or decisions that affect a neighborhood. These should be multiple voices displaying a single desire. It would then become the decision of the people, by the people and for the people. A neighborhood council is one of the major keys to changing the orientation of a city by creating a link between the population and an elected representative.

How to form a neighborhood council? The city council will appoint the crime prevention coordinator to oversee the dialogue between the city and the community. The coordinator will develop the neighborhood council from the leaders of Neighborhood Watch. The neighborhood council would appoint leaders and would be governed by Robert’s Rules of Order. Neighborhood Council members will coordinate with the Crime Prevention Coordinator the appropriate responses to citizen inquiries regarding community needs.

The district council would become the point of contact between the city and the inhabitants.

The city council would create a citywide newsletter that would keep the city up to date with what other neighborhoods are doing on certain topics, functions or events. The neighborhood council would make consultative decisions regarding city growth and community projects and events. He would recommend community solutions based on the recognized needs of their neighborhood. The neighborhood council would be an advisory body that assesses the community and the city.

A true leader will always recognize needs versus wants. Let us give power back to the people. Ask people what they need, versus what a politician wants to give them, then people will find that their decision makes a difference, and their voice will be heard across town. These are the people who transform a neighborhood; it is the people who bring unity and transparency. These are the people who bring security and stability to a community.

I believe that every neighborhood watch leader should form a neighborhood council that aims to get results for their community, not for interest groups and politicians. A neighborhood council is a coalition of people who speak to the city about quality of life, homelessness, businesses and new developments.

Will the city leaders listen? They would if they wanted to be re-elected by the people.

Delon Jackson is a retired Richmond Police Officer, a longtime Fairfield resident and a former vice president of the NAACP Richmond branch. Reach it at [email protected].


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Ire as Jerusalem tries to regulate the religious character of neighborhood councils https://crestviewna.org/ire-as-jerusalem-tries-to-regulate-the-religious-character-of-neighborhood-councils/ https://crestviewna.org/ire-as-jerusalem-tries-to-regulate-the-religious-character-of-neighborhood-councils/#respond Mon, 09 Nov 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/ire-as-jerusalem-tries-to-regulate-the-religious-character-of-neighborhood-councils/ A battle is waged in Jerusalem against a decision by the municipality to designate seats on the councils of communities as ultra-Orthodox or not. Seats are coming up for election on December 22. Mayor Moshe Lion and his administration believe that pre-designation of seats on the basis of religious affiliation can prevent power struggles during […]]]>

A battle is waged in Jerusalem against a decision by the municipality to designate seats on the councils of communities as ultra-Orthodox or not. Seats are coming up for election on December 22.

Mayor Moshe Lion and his administration believe that pre-designation of seats on the basis of religious affiliation can prevent power struggles during and after votes.

A furious appeal against the plan, made by the Grand Baka community council in south Jerusalem, was accepted on Wednesday, and other councils – including those of the Haredi – are appealing or considering doing so as well.

Community councils exist only in Jerusalem. They were put in place to ensure that the needs of the complex mosaic of populations across the city are met and to serve as a channel for dialogue between local residents and the municipality.

The councils are governed by a council of 15 people, nine elected and six others appointed by the municipality and the Association of Community Centers.

An artist on a balcony at a street festival in the Baka neighborhood of Jerusalem, on the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, October 12, 2014 (Nati Shohat, Flash90)

These councils receive money from the city, the Association of Community Centers, and fees charged for the wide range of community center activities. They set their own budgets and priorities, which in Grand Baka, for example, range from kindergartens, library services and sports facilities to celebrations, activities for the elderly, after-school programs and help. to urban planning.

Budgets can be big. Last year, the budget of the community council in Pisgat Ze’ev, for example, was 31.8 million shekels ($ 9.4 million), while that of Ginot Ha’ir, which covers eight neighborhoods, was 30.3 million shekels (just under $ 9 million).

The ultra-Orthodox have traditionally lived in the north of the city. But in recent years, high birth rates have led them increasingly to seek housing in some of the southern neighborhoods populated by secular and modern Orthodox Jews and those who define themselves as Masorti, or moderately religious.

This demographic shift has sparked clashes, with haredi demands for the closure of streets and recreational facilities on the Sabbath day meeting stiff opposition from secular Jews in neighborhoods such as Kiryat Hayovel in the city’s southwest. Tensions have been exacerbated in recent months by the refusal of certain segments of ultra-Orthodox society to obey coronavirus regulations.

An ultra-Orthodox man walks through the Kiryat Yovel neighborhood in Jerusalem on August 19, 2014 (Hadas Parush / Flash90)

The Times of Israel has learned that as next month’s elections approach, secular and ultra-Orthodox groups have approached Mayor Moshe Lion to express concern that their voices are not being heard in neighborhoods where they are a minority. .

This prompted Lion to ask officials to find a way to ensure that no community council can ignore the needs of a constituency.

According to the new policy, which was relayed to community councils just a week ago, the religious color of each of the nine elected seats will be determined on the basis of the votes cast for the municipal council elections in October 2018. For example, if Haredi parties in 2018 won one-third of the votes in a particular neighborhood, that neighborhood will now see one-third of the seats – three out of nine, and no more – reserved for ultra-Orthodox candidates in upcoming neighborhood polls.

Jerusalem Mayor Moshe Lion speaks at a launching ceremony for new electric buses in Jerusalem, September 3, 2019 (Hadas Parush / Flash90)

Based on this, the municipality determined that five of the seven councils ahead of the elections next month would have a seat reserved for a Haredi member and eight for representatives of the non-Haredi population. These were Homat Shmuel, Gonenim, Greater Baka and Ginot Ha’Ir to the south of the capital, and Pisgat Ze’ev to the north. As noted above, the Grand Baka has now been exempt from the new plan.

In the largely ultra-Orthodox Bayit Vegan neighborhood in West Jerusalem, two seats will be reserved for the “general population” and seven for the Haredim, while in Eshkolot (Shmuel Hanavi), eight seats will be Haredi and one will represent the rest. .

Applicants will be required to state their religious affiliation in advance and if residents are concerned that this has been misrepresented, they will have the right to appeal. Residents will be free to vote for whomever they want, regardless of their religious tendency.

Police officers speak with ultra-Orthodox Jewish men at a checkpoint leading to the Romema and Kiryat Belz neighborhoods in Jerusalem, which are stranded due to high rates of coronavirus infection, July 12, 2020 (by Yonatan Sindel / Flash90)

According to sources familiar with the initiative, who requested to remain anonymous, complaints about the new plan have flooded the municipality from both Haredi and non-Haredi communities.

In its appeal, the Grand Baka council said it opposes any kind of sectoral designation, insisting that the differences between the ultra-Orthodox and non-ultra-Orthodox populations bear no relation to the many activities of community councils.

Calling the new policy undemocratic, lamenting that it was introduced without consultation and demanding that it be rescinded, the council said candidates should be chosen on the basis of public confidence in them and “not on the basis of their beliefs and their way of life ”.

Ultra-Orthodox Jews cross the street at the Bar-Ilan intersection in Jerusalem, October 19, 2020 (Yonatan Sindel / Flash90)

The Haredi community, meanwhile, is at risk of losing the system in neighborhoods such as Pisgat Ze’ev and Homat Shmuel, where their numbers have increased since the municipal elections two years ago.

The situation will be different for other neighborhoods running for election next year, the sources said. In the largely secular Beit Hakerem, West Jerusalem, for example, no time slots are provided for the Haredim, while in the homogeneous Haredi Romema there will be no seats reserved for non-Orthodox.

“The Jerusalem Municipality strives to give representation in the management of community administrations to the variety of residents of the neighborhood, depending on their share and size in the neighborhood,” said a council statement. “This is to make sure that they [can be] active partners.


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Neighborhood councils meet virtually for the needs of the community https://crestviewna.org/neighborhood-councils-meet-virtually-for-the-needs-of-the-community/ https://crestviewna.org/neighborhood-councils-meet-virtually-for-the-needs-of-the-community/#respond Thu, 16 Jul 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://crestviewna.org/neighborhood-councils-meet-virtually-for-the-needs-of-the-community/ LOS ANGELES – The street bollards are plastic, but they offer a lot of safety for pedestrians, which is why Adriane Hoff advocated having them installed on the corner of Catalina and 7th. As an At-Large representative for the Wilshire Center Koreatown Neighborhood Council, she first heard about the need of students across the street […]]]>

LOS ANGELES – The street bollards are plastic, but they offer a lot of safety for pedestrians, which is why Adriane Hoff advocated having them installed on the corner of Catalina and 7th. As an At-Large representative for the Wilshire Center Koreatown Neighborhood Council, she first heard about the need of students across the street in RFK community schools when they initially called for a red light.

“But after doing further research with the Neighborhood Council, LADOT and the Herb Wesson office, it was determined that a brake light would not be the best option here,” said Adriane Hoff. “So these bollards essentially extend the sidewalk space and give pedestrians more space before entering traffic.”

As a member of the Planning, Land Use, Housing and Transportation Committee, Hoff reviews new development projects and provides recommendations ranging from affordable housing numbers to trees. That’s a lot to cover in one committee, but as a neighborhood council member, these are all issues around the corner where Hoff lives.

“The main issue that excites me is transportation,” Hoff said. “It intersects so much with other issues within the city such as housing, homelessness, climate change and it’s an issue I don’t think most Angelenos even consider.”

Neighborhood councils usually meet once a month and if you’re on a committee there are more meetings, but due to COVID-19, the Department of Neighborhood Empowerment has moved all meetings online.


What would you like to know

  • Neighborhood councils are advisory bodies that defend their communities at the town hall.
  • here are 99 neighborhood councils in Los Angeles, each serving 40,000 people.
  • The neighborhood council system was established in 1999.
  • The Wilshire Center Koreatown neighborhood council meets every second Monday.

“We will start with a roll call, starting with Adriane Hoff,” said the chair of the committee.

“Here,” Hoff replied.

Fortunately, the virtual meeting had a positive outcome.

“I certainly miss being one-on-one with my colleagues and with the community, but in a lot of ways it makes meetings a lot more accessible to people,” Hoff said. “For people who don’t have daycare and still have other evening obligations, they don’t have to put it all on hold just to show up to comment on an item on the agenda. “

Neighborhood council meetings are open to the public so that stakeholders do not have to occupy a seat to be heard. For Hoff, when she felt powerless to make a difference nationally, she felt compelled to get involved locally.

“What I could tell the difference was the local issues,” Hoff said. “And so, it’s been really rewarding to get involved, to have my voice heard and to motivate other members of the community as well. “


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